As in his home series, Mega Man's moveset relies heavily on various projectiles, giving his attacks unusual functions and characteristics. This extends beyond his special moves and into his standard moveset. For his neutral attack, he fires shots from his Mega Buster, and for his forward tilt, he fires shots from his Mega Buster while walking. His up tilt, the Mega Upper, is a jumping uppercut, and his down tilt is a forward slide.

Realizing that it would be very difficult for the armies to stop Wily, Dr. Light knew something had to be done. Rock, having a strong sense of justice, volunteered to be converted from his current state as a lab assistant into a fighting robot, or rather, a super fighting robot. Thus, on May 25,[10] he became known as "Mega Man" (Rockman in Japan).


Mega Man appeared in an episode of the Screwattack webseries Death Battle, where he fought against his original inspiration Astro Boy in Mega Man vs Astro Boy. He ultimately lost due to the research team claiming that his opponent was considerably faster, stronger and more durable all-round. According to the research team, Mega Man's only real advantage (His superior arsenal and much stronger ranged weaponry) wasn't even significant enough to gain the upper hand- all of his weapons bar the Mega Buster were vulnerable to eventually running out of energy with repeated use, and were unable to harm Astro Boy for the most part anyway due to his extreme speed/agility and durability.
Several incarnations of Zelda have ties to the Sheikah through both her connection to the various incarnations of Impa and Zelda's Sheikah alter-ego, Sheik. Interestingly enough, though not a true Sheikah (as Sheik is an alter-ego), Zelda's robes in Ocarina of Time and Twilight Princess feature the Sheikah Symbol. In the Oracle series, her robes feature an alternate version of the Sheikah Symbol with the "eye" part of the symbol replaced by a Triforce symbol. in Ocarina of Time, Zelda (in her guise as Sheik) is shown to be knowledgeable of various Sheikah legends, which were presumably told to her by Impa, either during her childhood and/or while they were hiding from Ganondorf. It is also implied that Impa trained Zelda in the secret arts of Sheikah in order to allow her to pass herself off as Sheik and better protect herself from Ganondorf and his minions.

I was completely addicted to the original Super Mario Kart on SNES and Mario Kart 64, but I never really got into any of them after that... probably because MK Super Circuit was so crummy, it broke the spell. I always buy whatever new MK that comes out, but I just dabble with them for a few days and then virtually forget about them. I kinda got into MK7 for a while, but only after Sugar Rush (Wreck-It Ralph) put me in the mood. It had been sitting and collecting dust for a couple of years prior to that.
So, would I recommend this game? Sure. Is it a must-have? Nah. If you're on the fence, wait until it goes on sale and play something better in the meantime. It's obviously been rushed out in the past couple years, and it's not much of a Final Fantasy game in terms of pacing and plot and cohesiveness in general, but it is a generally entertaining action RPG, if fairly repetitive.

Mega Man's first animated appearance was as a main character in the 1989 series Captain N: The Game Master, which features a myriad of characters that had appeared on Nintendo consoles up until that time. They all aid the title character, Captain N, in his quest to save the world of Videoland, encountering many villains, including Mega Man's own enemy Dr. Wily. Mega Man is green and is voiced in this series by Doug Parker. His character also has a speech impediment and a tendency to add the word "mega" in front of words for emphasis.
Whether racing around an obstacle-filled track or battling in an arena, drifting and tossing items are the keys to Mario Kart success. Players can shake the Wii Remote while launching off a ramp to pull off a trick that will temporarily boost their speed. When riding a bike, players can gain additional speed by flicking the Wii Remote up and popping a wheelie
Mega Man would later rank 16th on the third tier list, a very slight drop in favor of Marth claiming 10th place. Currently, however, due to his huge lack of consistent results, Mega Man is currently ranked 27th on the fourth and current tier list, suffering the largest drop between the third and fourth tier lists. Some smashers have said said that Mega Man should be higher due to his amazing projectile game and his matchup spread, while others like ZeRo think that Mega Man is overrated and that his placing is somewhat accurate.
A previous incarnation of the Princess of Hyrule is mentioned by Kass and Impa in the legend of the creation of the Divine Beasts and Guardians. In this tale, the princess, her knight, and four unnamed Champions successfully utilized the ancient Sheikah technology and were able to defeat Calamity Ganon ten thousand years prior to the events of Breath of the Wild. Both the current and Princess of Hyrule from ten thousand years ago are referred to as the "Goddess-blood Princess". This is likely a reference to the suggestion the Royal Family of Hyrule is descended from Hylia's mortal reincarnation the Spirit Maiden Zelda from Skyward Sword.
A 13-episode American animated TV series, adapted by DiC and distributed by Viacom Enterprises, aired in 1989. The animated Zelda shorts were broadcast each Friday, instead of the usual Super Mario Bros. cartoon which was aired during the rest of the week. The series loosely follows the two NES Zelda games (the original The Legend of Zelda and The Adventure of Link), mixing settings and characters from those games with original creations. The show's older incarnations of both Link and Zelda appear in various episodes of Captain N: The Game Master during its second season.

Stories have been worked on as a collaborative effort from multiple developers with concepts having drawn inspiration from multiple sources. In the early games, Sakaguchi drew inspiration from anime film maker Hayao Miyazaki, and staples such as chocobos and airships originally derived from them.[12] Furthermore, many have noted similarities between the series and Star Wars, present in references such as Biggs and Wedge and in recurring plot points such as an "Empire".[13] The series contains many darker themes of tragedy and loss, many inspired by the developers' own experiences. While developing Final Fantasy VII, the series creator Sakaguchi's mother died, which caused him to drastically reform the game's story to be about coping with loss.[14]
The series has overall enjoyed high critical acclaim, with varying success. Of the main series, six titles have reached a Metacritic score of or above 90: Final Fantasy VI at 91,[29] Final Fantasy VII at 92,[30] Final Fantasy VIII at 90,[31] Final Fantasy IX at 94,[32] Final Fantasy X at 92,[33] and Final Fantasy XII at 92.[34] The only game to reach a Metacritic score below 70 was the original Final Fantasy XIV launch at 49,[35], though the subsequent re-release, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, reached a score of 83.[36] The most critically acclaimed release was Final Fantasy IX,[32] while the poorest received by critics was the original Final Fantasy XIV.[35] Spinoffs, likewise, have enjoyed varied critical reception, though lower than that of the main series. Many spinoffs have been well received, such as Final Fantasy Tactics: The War of the Lions,[37] Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy[38] and Theatrhythm Final Fantasy Curtain Call.[39] Many other spinoffs have been poorly received, such as Final Fantasy: All the Bravest,[40] Dirge of Cerberus -Final Fantasy VII-,[41] and Final Fantasy IV: The After Years.[42]

Players can compete with up to three friends in their living room. Or challenge up to 11 opponents via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection in the biggest Mario Kart race yet. All tracks and modes of play are available via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, and players can visit the Mario Kart Channel to compete in tournaments, check rankings, see when their friends are playing and download ghost data.
In essence, Mega Man is a very versatile, medium-ranged projectile fighter who has no trouble spacing opponents, though KO attempts can be risky for him as he suffers slightly at close range due to the lag of his attacks. He has to use his effective spacing and grab punish options to rack up damage at medium range while keeping his distance until the opponent is weak enough to risk using one of his slow yet powerful finishing moves.

Zelda and Link appear as childhood friends in Four Swords.[62] Princess Zelda is assigned the duty of protecting the Four Sword Sanctuary and the Four Sword. One day, she sensed something unusual at the Four Sword Shrine and took Link to accompany her to investigate.[63] The seal on Vaati at the shrine had weakened, allowing Vaati to escape. Vaati kidnapped Princess Zelda to make her his bride and Link drew the Four Sword to save her.


Many games offer different systems to allow more freedom when growing characters' abilities and stats beginning as early as Final Fantasy II. Often this features a mix of the ability points system, in which points are used to grow abilities without being determined by a job. One of the popular systems is the Materia system featured in Final Fantasy VII and other games in its sub-series, where the player equips characters with Materia that contain various command or support abilities, and accumulating ability points allows the Materia to grow and gain stat boosts and new abilities. Similarly, the magicite featured in Final Fantasy VI allows the player to equip magicite remains of espers with the accumulated ability points allowing the characters to learn the magic spells they contain, and once reaching a certain threshold the character learns the ability permanently to use it even without the equipped magicite. This way the player can directly control which party members use which skills and customize their party to their preferred play style.
In the end, Mega Man defeated the remaining Robot Masters and infiltrated Wily's fortress. Along the way, Bass challenges him to a duel, having used Evil Energy to increase his power, but Mega Man emerges triumphant once more. When he finally reaches Dr. Wily, he is caught in an energy trap and is almost destroyed by Wily's machine's cannon, but is saved when Duo appears and takes the blast for him. Duo, now immobilized, is in turn saved by Proto Man. Mega Man thanks Proto Man for helping Duo recover and takes on Wily's newest machine.
In the noncanonical Ocarina of Time manga, author Himekawa Akira depicts Zelda requesting her true identity be sealed. Impa then actually transforms Zelda into a male, adding some controversy as to the exact nature of Zelda's Sheik transformation. Sheik also depicted as Zelda's alter-ego and a playable character in Hyrule Warriors and Hyrule Warriors Legends
Mario Kart Wii features twenty-four playable characters from the Mario series, which was the largest roster of any Mario Kart game until the release of Mario Kart 8 in 2014.[5] The game features characters who have appeared in previous installments, including Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, Yoshi, Toad, Donkey Kong, and Bowser, in addition to characters such as Rosalina and Dry Bowser who are playable for the first time. Unlike Mario Kart DS, where characters can drive a kart exclusive to that character and the standard go-kart, each character is assigned to one of three different weight classes, which affects the selection of vehicles the character can drive. In addition to this, Mario Kart Wii introduced two different classes of vehicles, Karts and Bikes, with the latter being a new addition to the series. Bikes were also subdivided further into two categories: regular and sports bikes, with sports bikes featuring an alternate drift type known as inside drifting. Mii characters saved in the console's Mii Channel are also playable.[4] Thirty-six vehicles, which includes both karts and bikes, are available in Mario Kart Wii, each of which has different properties that affect how the vehicle handles while driving. Half the characters and vehicles are initially unavailable to the player; certain objectives must be completed in order to unlock each one.
What he means by this is that Zelda's mother couldn't teach how to access the power to seal Gannon away. As Zelda grew older, she became the gossip mongers favorite subject. Behind her back, they whispered how she was heir to the throne of nothing and how she was a failure. She grew frustrated when Link became her guard, and she expressed that feeling by shouting at him.
According to GamesRadar, the Mega Man games were the first to feature a non-linear "level select" option. This was a stark contrast to both linear games (like Super Mario Bros.) and open world games (like The Legend of Zelda and Metroid). GamesRadar credits the "level select" feature of Mega Man as the basis for the non-linear mission structure found in most open-world, multi-mission, sidequest-heavy games, including modern games like Grand Theft Auto, Red Dead Redemption and Spider-Man: Shattered Dimensions.[18] In Street Fighter: Assassin's Fist tenth episode "Raging Demon", Ryu and Ken were seen playing Mega Man 2 from a gift from Ken's father.

Of the two gears available, the obvious standout is “Speed,” which allows you to slow down the world for brief but critical periods at the touch of a button. It would be hard to overstate how much this simple addition changes the feel of the game’s levels—an otherwise well-crafted, but not especially notable, collection of interesting gimmicks and corridors filled with the customary assortment of spikes and pits. The Mega Man formula typically stacks a horde of fast-moving, relatively fragile enemies against your hero, an aggressive, screen-clearing powerhouse who blasts them away to clear his path. By making Mega Man the most maneuverable thing in the equation, it inverts the basic question these games have been asking for 30 years, changing it from “How do I eliminate the obstacles in my way?” to “How do I elegantly weave my way through this situation in the fleetest, most stylish way possible?” Don’t want to deal with an awkwardly placed turret? Slow down time and navigate around it. An enemy leaps at you? Smack the Speed button, slide under them as they drift lazily over your head, and get on with your day. It’s empowering stuff, in a way that yet another flashy gun or attachment for your robot dog couldn’t match. The Speed gear’s mate, the Power gear, is far less of a game-changer, simply boosting your damage output and tweaking your special weapons, but it does force you to balance a shared heat gauge to keep either of the pair from burning out. And if that feels too restrictive, there’s also a low-key upgrade system on hand to ease the pressure and keep a careful player in bullet time as often as not. The game’s later levels push even this upgraded slowdown ability to its limits, but it never takes the full plunge into masochistic demands for perfect, precise play.

After the events of Mega Man II, Dr. Wily took control of an off-shore oil platform with some of his powerful Robot Masters. Once again, Dr. Light sends Mega Man to investigate and stop them before it gets out of hand. Mega Man takes down the first four Robot Masters and makes his way to the Wily Castle, where he discovers that four more Robot Masters await him. After defeating them, he encounters a new Mega Man Killer named Punk in the Wily Station, whose Screw Crusher delivers a crushing blow to its opponents. However, Mega Man promptly defeats Punk and defeats Wily with Punk's own weapon.
Zelda from The Wind Waker is the first Zelda in the series that fights along Link's side in his battle against Ganondorf. In battle, she wields the bow and Light Arrows, similar to her Twilight Princess counterpart.[31] Once Link and Zelda succeed in delivering the final blow, they witness the second flood of Hyrule and promise the King of Hyrule to search for the new land that will be home to the next kingdom of Hyrule.[121] Zelda is last seen as Tetra when she and Link set sail from Outset Island in search for new lands.[122]
So much about Mega Man 11 supplicates before the franchise’s carved-in-stone formula. Eight rogue Robot Masters under the control of the evil Dr. Wily need vanquishing. Mega Man must take out each renegade bot, acquire their unique ability, move on to the next, and then finally take down Dr. Wily himself. Mega Man can shoot, slide and call upon his robot dog Rush to scoot through levels. There are deadly spike traps, bottomless pits and a mechanized insurrection to put down.
Down special Default Leaf Shield 2% (circling), 3.8% (thrown) Mega Man summons leaf-shaped units that electromagnetically orbit around him. The leaves block projectiles, and can be fired forwards by pressing an attack button to land multiple hits, or used to deal additional damage to a grabbed enemy. The move is based on Wood Man's weapon from Mega Man 2.
I bought this game as a replacement for a Wii game my daughter wanted but I couldn't find. I never expected that I would LOVE it. I rarely play the Wii. It's pretty much a race game. There are several races with all kinds of courses, which go from easy to difficult. You get to choose your character, then the kind of vehicle you want to race in. You can choose to go for a test drive or race against a ghost (either of one of the wii developers or yourself). I've never played previous versions of this game, but they have the Gamecube version at my kids dentist's office and the wii edition of this game is about 1000 percent better in terms of graphics. While racing against other players, you can pick up different obstacles, like a banana, oil slick or bomb to throw at your opponents. Of course, they throw these things at you too, so you have to avoid them. You can also drive over ramps to give you a boost or pick up a tool to give you super speed or shield you from bombs, etc. I've played it with my kids and other adults and everybody always has a blast. I do like the wheel, but I can play the game fine without it, too. All in all it's a lot of fun, worth the extra money, and a great gift for someone who has a wii but you don't know what kind of game they want. I think this would be perfect for anybody, young and old.
After the final temple guardian is conquered, Zelda risks her life by revealing her identity and disclosing her position as the Seventh Sage. She informs Link that both of them hold pieces of the Triforce and gives him the Light Arrows, but moments later is captured by Ganondorf and imprisoned in a pink crystal in his castle. Following Ganondorf's defeat, she is freed and assists Link in his escape from the collapsing fortress. During the final battle, once Link has significantly weakened Ganon, Zelda intervenes using her magic. She and the other sages seal Ganon away without taking away his Triforce piece.
A series of video games was developed and released for the Philips CD-i in the early 1990s as a product of a compromise between Philips and Nintendo, after the companies failed to develop a CD-ROM peripheral for the Super NES. Created independently with no observation by or influence from Nintendo, the games are Link: The Faces of Evil and Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon, together with Zelda's Adventure. Nintendo never acknowledged them in the Zelda timeline, and they are considered to be in a separate, self-contained canon. These games are widely acknowledged to be the worst installments in the series.[102]
Magic is handled pretty terribly. It essentially functions as an elemental grenade that also damages you and your teammates that get caught in the blast, and unfortunately, your teammates' AI will absolutely run into a raging inferno and start screaming (sorry, Prompto). It wouldn't be quite so bad, I think, if the effects didn't linger in a wide area for at least 10 seconds afterwards, during which, again, your teammates will run into it and flail for however long it lasts. (Yes I know you can Regroup with Ignis to somewhat avoid this, but the fact that there's a workaround does not make it a good feature.)
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