Even now, years after its release, this game is one of the most pleasing, fun racing games available. It's simplicity, yet well done design, can't be beat. It is probably the only racing game that is aimed at family fun more than at trophies. Having Nintendo's classic characters as drivers is something that gamers of all ages enjoy. I have been a gamer since the days of Atari, that's how old I am, well, not that old really, but it shows how Mario Kart acomplish what other games don't, it brings not only memories back, but it manages to make the racing experience a unique one that brings players of all ages together.

Due to the large differences between the games in terms of setting and gameplay, opinions of games in the series tend to also differ greatly. As a result, when listing the best Final Fantasy games, many publications have very different listings, with the only real consensus being Final Fantasy VI almost always listed in first place and Final Fantasy VII being listed very highly, in many cases second place.[64][65][66][67][68]

From Final Fantasy X onward the series has had other composers as Uematsu eventually left Square to go freelance, though he has continued to compose music for the series for as recent as the original Final Fantasy XIV. The soundtrack for Final Fantasy X was a joint effort between Uematsu, Masashi Hamauzu, and Junya Nakano, the music for Final Fantasy XII was mainly composed by Hitoshi Sakimoto, Masashi Hamauzu did the soundtrack for Final Fantasy XIII, and Yoko Shimomura—who had previously composed the music for Square Enix's Kingdom Hearts series—composed the music for Final Fantasy XV.
Back in the present time, Mega Man and Rush were finally closing in on Wily’s fortress, defeating the first four set of Robot Masters. After penetrating into Wily's lair, Mega Man finds another four Robot Masters awaiting him via teleporters. Mega Man manages to defeat all eight of his adversaries and engages his modified future self Quint in combat. After defeating him, Mega Man obtains his weapon, a pogostick-like device called the Sakugarne. With it, he makes his way to the new Wily Station in space and defeats him yet again.
Square Enix has expanded the Final Fantasy series into various media. Multiple anime and computer-generated imagery (CGI) films have been produced that are based either on individual Final Fantasy games or on the series as a whole. The first was an original video animation (OVA), Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals, a sequel to Final Fantasy V. The story was set in the same world as the game, although 200 years in the future. It was released as four 30-minute episodes, first in Japan in 1994 and later in the United States by Urban Vision in 1998. In 2001, Square Pictures released its first feature film, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within. The film is set on a future Earth invaded by alien life forms.[45] The Spirits Within was the first animated feature to seriously attempt to portray photorealistic CGI humans, but was considered a box office bomb and garnered mixed reviews.[45][46][47]

Jump up ↑ "The gods chose which of the kingdom's subjects would ascend to the new land, telling them to escape to the tallest mountains. They then flooded the world, sinking Ganondorf and Hyrule to the bottom of the ocean and sealing them away. Though the king was sealed along with his kingdom, the princess took a piece of the Triforce that had been broken in two by the king and managed to escape to the ocean's surface with several of her retainers." (Hyrule Historia (Dark Horse Books), pg. 123)
While I can overlook and even grudgingly appreciate the graphics, it’s the sound that is Mega Man 11’s biggest oversight. For a series so famous for its tunes, the sedate, repetitive, techno background is a real letdown: Why not just use cool, retro-sounding chiptunes like the rest of the games if you don’t have any strong new musical ideas? Mega Man 11 also has some terrifically bad voice acting, which I actually got a kick out of -- but eventually, the repetitive callouts (Speed Gear!) got on my coworkers’ nerves, prompting them to politely ask me to turn it down. You can choose to view subtitles and hear what few dialogue lines there are in Japanese, but if you did that you’d be missing out on Mega Man’s new, rich baritone -- only in English! I guess after 10 games in 31 years he really has become a Man.
I was completely addicted to the original Super Mario Kart on SNES and Mario Kart 64, but I never really got into any of them after that... probably because MK Super Circuit was so crummy, it broke the spell. I always buy whatever new MK that comes out, but I just dabble with them for a few days and then virtually forget about them. I kinda got into MK7 for a while, but only after Sugar Rush (Wreck-It Ralph) put me in the mood. It had been sitting and collecting dust for a couple of years prior to that.
Jump up ↑ "Princess Zelda...you foolish traitor! I commend you for avoiding my pursuit for seven long years. But you let your guard down... I knew you would appear if I let this kid wander around! My only mistake was to slightly underestimate the power of this kid... No... It was not the kid's power I misjudged, it was the power of the Triforce of Courage! But, with the Triforce of Wisdom that Zelda has... When I obtain these two Triforces... Then, I will become the true ruler of the world!! If you want to rescue Zelda, come to my castle!" — Ganondorf (Ocarina of Time)

Some of Princess Zelda's physical abilities are demonstrated in games such as The Wind Waker, Twilight Princess and Spirit Tracks. In The Wind Waker, Princess Zelda aids Link in battling Ganondorf by borrowing the young hero's bow and using it to fire Light Arrows at the King of the Gerudo.[31] This skill is again portrayed in the final battle of Twilight Princess, where the princess yet again uses a bow and Light Arrows to strike Ganondorf while accompanying Link on his horse,[38] and once more in the final battle against Malladus in Spirit Tracks. In one scene of Twilight Princess, Princess Zelda is seen wielding a sword, although it is unknown if she possesses any true sword skills.
Convinced that Ganondorf was after the Triforce, Zelda asked Link to find the three Spiritual Stones that would open the Temple of Time in order to prevent Ganondorf from opening the Door of Time and claiming the Triforce for himself.[66][67] Unfortunately, Ganondorf made his move before Link could return, leading an insurrection in the castle. He chased after Zelda, who had the Ocarina of Time in her possession, when Impa escaped with her from the castle. Dashing out of the castle town with Ganondorf in hot pursuit, Zelda caught sight of Link diving out of their way. She turned and threw the Ocarina of Time to him, trusting that he would keep it safe while Ganondorf chased after them.[68][69]
Princess is also featured in other media, including comics based on the games, animated shows, and the Super Smash Bros. series. In some of her appearances, she is depicted as a brave, proud, and self-reliant fighter who is proficient in archery and horseback riding, such as in the The Legend of Zelda comics by Valiant Comics and The Legend of Zelda TV series. As with the games, she is the protector of the Triforce of Wisdom.
The Mario Kart series has been referenced twice in the Paper Mario role-playing game series. Luigi references it in an "adventure" of his which he recounts between chapters of Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, where in the third of his stories, he states that he visited a location called "Circuit Break Island" where kart races are organized every day. Later, in Paper Mario: Color Splash, once all six Big Paint Stars have been retrieved, Luigi drives his kart on Rainbow Road to transport Mario to Bowser's castle to defeat him and restore peace to Prism Island; when Bowser (who has been transformed by black paint) is reverted to normal upon his defeat, he asks Mario if they have a kart race scheduled. Additionally, several stages based on Mario Kart have appeared in the Super Smash Bros. series: Super Smash Bros. Brawl features a Mario Circuit stage based on Figure-8 Circuit from Mario Kart DS, Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS features a Rainbow Road stage based on its appearance in Mario Kart 7, and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U features a Mario Circuit stage based on its appearance in Mario Kart 8, as well as reusing the Mario Circuit stage from Brawl. Although not actually shown in the first Super Smash Bros. for the Nintendo 64, the franchise (which at that time had been composed of just Super Mario Kart and Mario Kart 64) was alluded to in a promotional ad for the game in Nintendo Power, where it mentioned that Nintendo's famous cast had previously "raced go-karts" when announcing their new role in the fighting ring.
When Link was appointed as Zelda's personal knight by King Rhoam after defeating a Guardian that went haywire during an experiment with a simple Pot Lid, her insecurities in regards to her inability to awaken her powers came to the surface, resulting in her lashing out at him out of jealousy due to his apparent success in fulfilling his destiny as he could already wield the Master Sword. Additionally she mistook Link's silence as a sign that he likely hated her. She grew tired of him following her around seeing him as a constant reminder of her own failure. However Link refused to follow her orders as the King assigned him to protect her which was his sworn duty as Captain of her Imperial Guard detail. Zelda even resorted to abusing Gerudo Town law to allude Link's protection detail though ended up falling asleep while calibrating Vah Naboris and Urbosa informed Link of her where abouts. Urbosa would also foil an assassinate attempt by disguised Yiga Clan members though Zelda convinced her to spare their lives. However, after Link saved Zelda's life when the Yiga Clan tried to assassinate her again near Kara Kara Bazaar, she realized that it was wrong of her to take her frustrations out on him, and befriended him thereafter. She was surprised to discover how gluttonous Link was and discovered his silence was due to his burden as chosen hero despite his skills he still had doubts but shouldered the burden of his destiny causing Zelda to see Link in an entirely new light. She came to respect and admire his dedication to his knightly training. The two bonded over the burdens they carried though Zelda became worried by Link's tendency to be reckless even noting there is a thin line between courage and recklessness.

Wily stumbled upon Proto Man one day, who was dying when his energy system was malfunctioning. He repaired him, and while analyzing him he discovered that he had found a way to create robots at the same level as Dr. Light. He decided to reprogram Dr. Light's industrial robots to exact revenge. One day, the industrial robots became misled and forced under his rule. With his new followers, Wily seized control of the city and demanded recognition. This string of events set in motion what would later become the purpose for Mega Man's existence.
Associated with the Goddess Nayru and the Triforce of Wisdom, Zelda possesses keen insight and good judgment—although this does not always avail her in eschewing capture. Most of Zelda's incarnations are additionally gifted with innate psychic or magical potencies, such as telepathy and precognition. Albeit her gamut of abilities has yet to be revealed, Zelda has demonstrated the ability to cast spells, engender or annul barriers and seals, and shoot a bow. The source of most of these natural mystical powers could be explained by the presence of the Light Force, a power that is passed down through the Royal Family of Hyrule for generations. However Breath of the Wild implies the various incarnations of the Princess are descended from Hylia presumably through the Spirit Maiden from Skyward Sword indicating some of her powers may be divine in nature specifically her sealing powers and ability to communicate with spirits though these latent abilities must be awoken through ritual and devotion to Hylia according to legend though the Zelda of Breath of the Wild struggles despite years of dedicated training and only awakens them through selflessly trying to protect Link.
That's good to see....though it's very weird they're doing this in Asia only, and not the US where this game would have shown much better performance with retail shelf visibility during the Christmas rush, given the family friendly nature. I really have no idea what on Earth Squeenix was thinking with how they've handled the release of this game. I'm not sure Squeenix knows either...it's kind of their M.O. these days....
In essence, Mega Man is a very versatile, medium-ranged projectile fighter who has no trouble spacing opponents, though KO attempts can be risky for him as he suffers slightly at close range due to the lag of his attacks. He has to use his effective spacing and grab punish options to rack up damage at medium range while keeping his distance until the opponent is weak enough to risk using one of his slow yet powerful finishing moves.
The chronology of the Legend of Zelda series was a subject of much debate among fans until an official timeline was released within the Hyrule Historia collector's book, which was first released in Japan in December 2011.[31][32] Prior to its release, producers confirmed the existence of a confidential document, which connected all the games.[33][34] Certain materials and developer statements once partially established an official timeline of the released installments. Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is a direct sequel to the original The Legend of Zelda, and takes place several years later.[35][36] The third game, A Link to the Past, is a prequel to the first two games,[37][38][39] and is directly followed by Link's Awakening.[40][41] Ocarina of Time is a prequel that takes the story many centuries back; according to character designer Satoru Takizawa, it was meant to implicitly tell the story of the Imprisoning War from the manual of A Link to the Past, with Majora's Mask directly following its ending.[42][43] Skyward Sword is then a prequel to Ocarina of Time.[44] Twilight Princess is set more than 100 years after Ocarina of Time.[45][46]

The series has inspired numerous game developers. Fable creator Peter Molyneux considers Final Fantasy VII to be the RPG that "defined the genre" for him.[215] BioWare founder Greg Zeschuk cited Final Fantasy VII as "the first really emotionally engaging game" he played and said it had "a big impact" on BioWare's work.[216] The Witcher 3 senior environmental artist Jonas Mattsson cited Final Fantasy as "a huge influence" and said it was "the first RPG" he played through.[217] Mass Effect art director Derek Watts cited Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within as a major influence on the series,[218] and BioWare senior product manager David Silverman cited Final Fantasy XII's gambit system as an influence on the gameplay of Dragon Age: Origins.[219] Ubisoft Toronto creative director Maxime Beland cited the original Final Fantasy as a major influence on him.[220]


Breath of the Wild is notably the first and only game where Link and Zelda held feelings of animosity towards each other, until they learned to open up to one another. Once learning to do so, the two came to genuinely care for one another, with both Hylians refusing to sacrifice each other for their own safety, no matter what peril they may be in. This is to the extent where Zelda unconsciously awoke her powers (despite previously being unable to do so, no matter how hard she tried) by shielding Link from a Guardian`s attack, showing how much he means to her. When Link temporarily died, Zelda wept at his body, lamenting his death. Upon learning from the Master Sword that Link can be revived, Zelda wasted no time rescuing Link, while also deciding to use her newfound powers to hold Ganon at bay.

Jump up ↑ "Princess Zelda...you foolish traitor! I commend you for avoiding my pursuit for seven long years. But you let your guard down... I knew you would appear if I let this kid wander around! My only mistake was to slightly underestimate the power of this kid... No... It was not the kid's power I misjudged, it was the power of the Triforce of Courage! But, with the Triforce of Wisdom that Zelda has... When I obtain these two Triforces... Then, I will become the true ruler of the world!! If you want to rescue Zelda, come to my castle!" — Ganondorf (Ocarina of Time)
The new release boasts a rich and varied repertoire of favorites and surprises, developed by the minds of Nobuo Uematsu, game developers SQUARE ENIX and the Distant Worlds production. Performed by the Distant Worlds Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus, recorded in November 2014 at the famed Dvorak Hall of the Rudolfinum in Prague (Czech Republic) and AWR Music Studio in Chicago (USA) and featuring the remarkable singing talents of Distant Worlds favorite, Susan Calloway, Distant Worlds III is recorded in high resolution at 88.2khz/24bit.

Even now, years after its release, this game is one of the most pleasing, fun racing games available. It's simplicity, yet well done design, can't be beat. It is probably the only racing game that is aimed at family fun more than at trophies. Having Nintendo's classic characters as drivers is something that gamers of all ages enjoy. I have been a gamer since the days of Atari, that's how old I am, well, not that old really, but it shows how Mario Kart acomplish what other games don't, it brings not only memories back, but it manages to make the racing experience a unique one that brings players of all ages together.
In the early 2000s, Nintendo of America released a timeline on the official website of the series, which interpreted all stories up to the Oracle games as the adventures of a single protagonist named Link.[52] At one point, translator Dan Owsen and his coworkers at Nintendo of America had conceived another complete timeline and intended to make it available online. However, the Japanese series developers rejected the idea so the timeline would be kept open to the imagination of the players.[53]
The series features a number of recurring character archetypes. Most famously, every game since Final Fantasy II, including subsequent remakes of the original Final Fantasy, features a character named Cid. Cid's appearance, personality, goals, and role in the game (non-playable ally, party member, villain) vary dramatically. However, two characteristics many versions of Cid have in common are 1) being a scientist or engineer, and 2) being tied in some way to an airship the party eventually acquires. Every Cid has at least one of these two traits.
Sakaguchi wanted the game to have a simple abbreviation in the Roman alphabet (FF) and a four-syllable abbreviated Japanese pronunciation (efu-efu). "Fantasy" was chosen due to the setting, though "Final" was originally intended to be "Fighting", and was changed to avoid conflict with the tabletop game Fighting Fantasy.[4] Though Final Fantasy was released at a time when competing games, such as Sega's Phantasy Star and Dragon Quest III, were released, it pulled Square out of its financial crisis, and when released three years later in North America, outsold several of its peers.
^ "Zelda: The interview!". Nintendo of Europe GmbH. November 17, 2004. Archived from the original on October 12, 2007. Retrieved May 30, 2010. NoE: How does the Minish Cap fit into the Zelda chronology? Is it a prequel to the upcoming The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures on GameCube? Aonuma: Yes, this title takes place prior to The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures, and tells the secret of the birth of the Four Sword.

While those of you playing post-release will have the advantage of being able to Google up a boss-weakness guide for Mega Man 11 (because I wrote it for you), figuring out the boss order was definitely the biggest overall challenge in this universally tough game and I recommend that you at least attempt it on your own. Again, the marathon-length levels can make this a slog if you don’t end up having the right weapon, and unclear checkpoints mean you’ll have to repeat large sections if you slip up. While some tough, modern games like Super Meat Boy and Celeste let you respawn instantly, Dr. Light has yet to perfect that technology, so you’ll be hiking back through long portions of difficult levels. Personally, I like that: Failing in a video game should have consequences. Dark Souls players get it.
At its core, Deluxe is the same great title from Wii U. Racing up a wall is still disorienting fun, and taking the perfect shot with your green shell is satisfying as ever. Even with all the hours I poured into the original Wii U release, I still love the thrill of coming from behind in the final lap to win the race. Of course, some of that is thanks to the questionable rubber-band A.I. that has always been a sticking point of the series, but fans accepted that pitfall as a series mainstay long ago.

In The Minish Cap, Princess Zelda is known to sneak out of the castle to visit her good childhood friend, Link.[57] At the beginning of the game, Link and Zelda head together towards the Picori Festival in Hyrule Castle Town.[58] A catastrophe occurs when the evil wind mage, Vaati, appears and turns Zelda to stone, breaking the Picori Blade in the process. Link fuses the four elements to transform the blade into the Four Sword to reverse Vaati's spell. When Link saves Princess Zelda atop the roof of Hyrule Castle where she was being imprisoned by Vaati to steal the Light Force within her, she reveals to Link that she saw visions of him, as if in a dream.[59] However, soon after this, the castle begins to collapse.[60] As Link and Zelda head towards the Elemental Sanctuary, Vaati appears again and is subsequently defeated by Link. The Mage's Cap falls down and Ezlo, now a Minish again, urges Princess Zelda to make a wish. Princess Zelda thus wishes for Hyrule to return to its usual, peaceful state, making all the monsters disappear and returning its people back to normal.[61]


WatchMojo.com has frequently placed titles in the series in top ten lists, including top 10 JRPGs of all time*,[76] top 10 PSOne games*,[77] top ten PSOne RPGs*,[78] top ten PlayStation games of all time*,[79] and top ten Super Nintendo RPGs*.[80] The series held seven Guinness World Records in its Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition 2008, including "Most Games in an RPG Series", "Longest Development Period"* and "Fastest Selling Console RPG in a Single Day";[81] in the subsequent issue in 2009, two titles in the series featured in its top 50 console games*.[82]
The Final Fantasy games feature a variety of music, and frequently reuse themes. Most of the games open with a piece called "Prelude", which has evolved from a simple, 2-voice arpeggio in the early games to a complex, melodic arrangement in recent installments.[23][73][94] Victories in combat are often accompanied by a victory fanfare, a theme that has become one of the most recognized pieces of music in the series. The basic theme that accompanies Chocobo appearances has been rearranged in a different musical style for each installment. A piece called "Prologue" (and sometimes "Final Fantasy"), originally featured in the first game, is often played during the ending credits.[73] Although leitmotifs are common in the more character-driven installments, theme music is typically reserved for main characters and recurring plot elements.[46]
…which is nothing compared to how online play is like. I will admit that I have seen some pretty nasty moves that other players have pulled like people in lower places firing behind them a lot even though they are clearly in range of the racers ahead of them. Other instances where racers shoot each other a lot can end up giving first place an even bigger lead due to constant sabotage. I have ran into some instances where I was hit more times than the AI does in a single race. You could be doing so well and be on the final stretch when a blue shell appears and blows you up, then end up getting hit by other players so many times, that you end up in last place.
Gameplay systems were originally based on those seen in RPGs released at the time the series was developed, though many systems which would become series staples were designed by Hiroyuki Ito. Ito developed systems, such as the Active Time Battle system inspired by Formula One racing (the concept of different character types being able to "overtake" each other). Ito refined the job system in Final Fantasy V to become the system used frequently throughout the series, and designed the Gambits system for Final Fantasy XII.[9] Other systems, such as the Materia system in Final Fantasy VII, were designed as a group effort, and was designed so the combat changed depending on how the Materia was used, as opposed to characters having innate skills.[10] Toshiro Tsuchida would design systems for other games, such as the removal of Active Time Battle in Final Fantasy X to replace with conditional turn-based battle, and later designed the Command Synergy Battle system for Final Fantasy XIII to make battles appear as visually impressive as in the movie Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children.[11] The MMO gameplay systems have been drastically different, but mostly drawn inspiration from a mix of the Final Fantasy games and from other games in the genre.
100 hundred years later, Zelda telepathically speaks to an awakened Link, giving him words of advice. At Hyrule Castle, Zelda aids Link in his battle with Calamity Ganon's second form, Dark Beast Ganon, gifting him with the Light Bow and giving him advice on how to defeat him. After Link hits Ganon's weak spot, Zelda herself appears, freed from her own sealing magic. She then uses her powers to seal away Ganon for good, entrapping him in an explosion of light. As she and Link reunite face-to-face for the first time in a hundred years, she asks him with a smile if he remembers her. At the end of the game, Link and Zelda walk towards their horses to begin their new adventure together. Interestingly, it is revealed by Kass after completing all of his shrine quest riddles, that his mentor had been in love with the princess, yet noticed she "only had eyes for her appointed knight". This hints that Zelda holds deep feelings toward Link, with it being unclear if Link reciprocates these feelings.
When Link awakens from his seven-year slumber in the Sacred Realm, he encounters Zelda, disguised as a young man of about Link's age named Sheik, who claims to be a survivor of the Sheikah Tribe. Thereafter, Sheik gives Link clues to the locations of the various temples, and teaches him special songs enabling him to warp to specific points near these temples.

Jump up ↑ "When evil rules all, an awakening voice from the Sacred Realm will call those destined to be Sages, who dwell in the five temples. One in a deep forest... One on a high mountain... One under a vast lake... One within the house of the dead... One inside a goddess of the sand... Together with the Hero of Time, the awakened ones will bind the evil and return the light of peace to the world..." — Sheik (Ocarina of Time)
The series has had multiple directors: Sakaguchi directed the first five installments, Yoshinori Kitase and Ito collaboratively directed Final Fantasy VI, and the two went on to direct many later installments on their own. Ito directed Final Fantasy IX and Final Fantasy XII, while Kitase developed Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII and Final Fantasy X. After Final Fantasy X Kitase decided to stop directing but remained involved as a producer instead, choosing Motomu Toriyama as the director for Final Fantasy XIII and its sequels. The MMO releases have had multiple directors, though most recently, Naoki Yoshida has directed Final Fantasy XIV. Hajime Tabata started with directing spin-off games for portable gaming systems with Before Crisis -Final Fantasy VII- and Crisis Core -Final Fantasy VII-, but when Final Fantasy Versus XIII became Final Fantasy XV Tabata took over the role of director.

Following Ganon's defeat and while Princess Zelda and Link had left to return the Master Sword to its pedestal, the battle weary Hyrulean Soldiers lead by Impa were confronted by the remnants of Ganondorf's army of monsters which took advantage of the situation to attack the ruins of Hyrule Castle. However despite her absence and their exhaustion, the soldiers valiantly defended the kingdom, though Impa later had them retreat in order to rest while she and the newly arrived Linkle engaged the monsters, though they vowed to return once they had regained their strength. True to their word, the soldiers returned to the battlefield and assisted Impa and Linkle by confronting the lesser monsters, allowing Impa and Linkle focused on defeating Dark King Dodongo. The Hyrulean Forces eventually prevailed over the Monster Forces just as their princess was return to the castle with Link.


Six years after the events of A Link to the Past, Hyrule is enjoying a time of peace and tranquility, but Princess Zelda suffers from a dark, recurring dream showing a shadow over a temple; a premonition of evil to come. One day, she witnesses a mysterious and brilliant light in the sky to the east. Aginah, the younger brother of the wise man Sahasrahla and now living in his old hideout near the Eastern Palace also witnesses such a light, and travels to investigate. There he finds a strange youth lying on the ground. Zelda, also following the light, meets up with Aginah, and they both carry the child to rest in Sahasrahla's hideout. Confused by the youth's unusual clothes, they believe the child not to hail from Kakariko Village. Speaking to Aginah while the youngster sleeps, Zelda learns that his brother Sahasrahla had also sensed danger surrounding Hyrule and had left the land to find the hero, Link. While Link has not yet returned, Zelda senses that if this new youth was endowed with courage, he or she may be the Hero of Light. Zelda then sets of for Hyrule Castle before sending Aginah to find the Book of Mudora while she speaks to the Fortune Teller. Aginah and the hero travel to the Sanctuary at the foot of the mountain, but Zelda follows, claiming she had another prophetic dream, this time of her holding the Book of Mudora on top of Death Mountain. Zelda insists on traveling with the hero to the summit of the mountain, as she is the only one who can read the Book of Mudora. During their quest to obtain the final two tablets and reach the summit, the Fortune Teller sees the King of Evil in a vision. Ganon's malice had kept his spirit alive despite the destruction of his body. It was this lingering evil power that had drawn the Hero of Light into the land of Hyrule, and upon the summit the hero travels once more into another world to engage in a desperate final battle with the Demon King in a new version of Ganon's Tower. Ganon desires the power of the Hero of Light to be fully reborn, but is finally destroyed using the Silver Arrows once more.
Ocarina of Time was re-released on the GameCube in 2002, when it was offered as a pre-order incentive for The Wind Waker in the U.S., Canada and Japan.[67] Europe continued to receive it free in every copy of The Wind Waker, except for the discounted Player's Choice version. It includes what is widely believed to be the remnants of a cancelled 64DD expansion for Ocarina of Time known as Ura Zelda in early development. Named Ocarina of Time Master Quest, the game was given the addition of revamped, more difficult dungeon layouts.[67] Ocarina of Time was included as part of the Collector's Edition for the GameCube in 2003.[68] It is now available through the Wii's Virtual Console service.[69] In 2011, Nintendo released a new version of the game in stereoscopic 3D for the Nintendo 3DS, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time 3D. In July 2015, Nintendo rereleased it for the Wii U Virtual Console.[70]
The VS mode involves player(s) racing a track of their choice and also feature customized rules such as team racing and item frequency. VS mode has been changed several times throughout the series. In earlier games, VS mode is exclusive to multiplayer without any computer-controlled racers. Starting from Mario Kart DS, VS mode can be played either single player with CPU racers, or multiplayer with or without CPU racers. A notable exception is Mario Kart 7, where single-player VS races are removed and limited only to multiplayer, but the rules remain the same as in Mario Kart DS and later installments.

Magic is handled pretty terribly. It essentially functions as an elemental grenade that also damages you and your teammates that get caught in the blast, and unfortunately, your teammates' AI will absolutely run into a raging inferno and start screaming (sorry, Prompto). It wouldn't be quite so bad, I think, if the effects didn't linger in a wide area for at least 10 seconds afterwards, during which, again, your teammates will run into it and flail for however long it lasts. (Yes I know you can Regroup with Ignis to somewhat avoid this, but the fact that there's a workaround does not make it a good feature.)
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