Prior the events of Majora's Mask, Zelda spends a relatively short period of time with Link, before he leaves Hyrule for his quest in search of his companion Navi.[105][106] Zelda, as a child, makes a single appearance in Majora's Mask when Link has a flashback after retrieving the Ocarina of Time from the Skull Kid. The events of the flashback display Link's last meeting with Zelda, where she states her belief that they would meet again.[107] However, before Link departs the land of Hyrule, Princess Zelda gives him the Ocarina of Time to prevent Ganondorf from entering the Sacred Realm and as a memento of the time they spent together.[108][109] She also teaches Link the "Song of Time", a melody that holds a special meaning to her,[110] before handing over the ocarina, mentioning that he should play that melody if something were to happen to him so the Goddess of Time will come to his aid.[111][112]
In Grand Prix, one player is required to race against eleven (formerly seven) computer-controlled characters in a "cup," a series of four races (five in Super Mario Kart). Mario Kart games typically have four recurring difficulty levels: 50cc, 100cc, 150cc, and an extra "Mirror" mode (where tracks are inverted left-to-right); starting in Mario Kart 8, a fifth difficulty level, 200cc, was added. As the player progresses through the cups, the courses become more difficult, and as the difficulty level increases, the vehicles go faster. Players earn points according to their finishing position in each race. In earlier games, if a player finishes in a lower position, they must replay the race and may not proceed until a higher placing is achieved. The racer with the highest number of points after all races have been completed wins a trophy: bronze for third place, silver for second, and gold for first. Grand Prix is also playable in multiplayer mode for up to four players, though this does not affect the rest of the gameplay rules. Grand Prix is known as Mario Kart GP in the first three games.
Outside of battles the player can explore the field for items, dialog with non-player characters, and for trading in gil for items and gear. In games featuring instanced random encounters, the party will encounter an enemy randomly while exploring dangerous areas (though abilities to reduce the encounter rate can be learned), while games with free-roaming enemies have enemies appear in the dangerous areas for the player to engage or avoid.

What he means by this is that Zelda's mother couldn't teach how to access the power to seal Gannon away. As Zelda grew older, she became the gossip mongers favorite subject. Behind her back, they whispered how she was heir to the throne of nothing and how she was a failure. She grew frustrated when Link became her guard, and she expressed that feeling by shouting at him.

Mega Man's personality seems to stem from his creator, Dr. Light, whose intention may have been to design Rock based on his own interpretation of a real boy as if it were his very own son. Rock, who would later be upgraded into the super fighting robot known as Mega Man, demonstrates a wide range of emotions, similar to that of a prepubescent boy, not typical of other robots, thus making him unique.
Though all incarnations of Mega Man feature unique stories, settings, and characters, they share several common features. All main Mega Man games released prior to 1997 are side-scrolling action platformers. The player character must fight through the levels using Mega Man's "Mega Buster"—a cannon attached to his arm—to shoot the robotic enemies inhabiting his environment. When Mega Man was released in 1987, the characteristic that made it revolutionary was the choice given to the player of which robot master to attempt first. After defeating a Robot Master—the boss of a level—Mega Man gains the ability to use that Robot Master's special weapon. Each Robot Master is representative of a specific element or object, with such bosses as Fire Man, Ice Man, Guts, Griffith, and Elec Man. The weapons Mega Man gains share the theme of the defeated boss. After defeating all of the Robot Masters, Mega Man travels to a multi-stage fortress to confront Dr. Wily, the person responsible for the robotic enemies' destructive acts. In the fortress, Mega Man fights past new bosses, clones of the game's Robot Masters, and Wily, who is usually in a large multi-phase war machine.
Square had been developing simple RPGs, pseudo-3D games and racing games, although they failed to compete with the market, and did not perform well commercially. Series creator Hironobu Sakaguchi and his team grew pessimistic at the failures as the company faced bankruptcy, so he began to develop the RPG Final Fantasy as a personal final project to leave a legacy; if the game had sold poorly, he would have quit the industry to return to university.[3]
Three Zelda-themed LCD games were created between 1989 and 1992. The Zelda version of Nintendo's Game & Watch series was released first in August 1989 as a dual-screen handheld electronic game similar in appearance to today's Nintendo DS. It was re-released in 1998 as a Toymax, Inc. Mini Classic and was later included as an unlockable extra in Game & Watch Gallery 4, a 2002 compilation for the Game Boy Advance. While the Game & Watch Zelda was developed in-house by Nintendo, the subsequent two LCD games were developed by third parties under license by Nintendo. In October 1989, The Legend of Zelda was developed by Nelsonic as part of its Game Watch line. This game was an actual digital watch with primitive gameplay based on the original Legend of Zelda. In 1992, Epoch Co. developed Zelda no Densetsu: Kamigami no Triforce for its Barcode Battler II console. The game employed card-scanning technology similar to the later-released Nintendo e-Reader.
But even after getting chocobos, there's the extremely irritating issue of literal miles of invisible walls along roadways for no discernable reason I can see other than to make it difficult to get anywhere with any degree of ease. It wouldn't even be quite so irritating if it was a consistent rule, but it isn't! Some rails you can jump off of, some you can't, and there is no way to tell the difference until you try. It might make sense if it was a drop that would probably kill you if you lept off, but usually it's just some grass on the other side, infuriatingly out of reach over a very low jump unless you take the looooong way around. And, again, some of these rails go on for miles. How fun do you think it is to run your chocobo for miles and miles, searching for some obtuse way out? What a stupid decision.
Historically speaking, Mega Man games that moved away from the squat, pixelated, grimacing Mega Man art style have had mixed results. While I never fully warmed up to Mega Man 11’s cutesy, highly-detailed graphical style, the new look didn’t interfere with the classic feel of Mega Man as it did in Mega Man 7, a beautiful, but slow and clunky game. There are some fantastic robot designs, like massive skull-faced pillars that shoot lasers from their mouths, a wooly mammoth on a hoverboard, and an ostrich that’s on fire. These recall the art of early Mega Man games while filling out contemporary 16:9 wide screens (a series first!), dwarfing Mega Man. It’s a great effect to make me feel nimble as I’m sliding around with time at a standstill to avoid giant, crazed bots.
While Paya was born after Zelda sealed Ganon in Hyrule Castle, she has heard stories about her from Impa and respected her. Meeting with Link whom Paya found attractive and develops feelings for however, caused her to become slightly jealous of Zelda. Later on Paya comes to accept that while she may never be with Link, she is content with knowing what love for someone feels like, indicating that she dropped any feelings of jealousy towards the princess.

The series has become a commercial success, and is the best selling Square Enix franchise with over 130 million units sold worldwide.[2] This makes it one of the best selling franchises world-wide. The best selling title has been Final Fantasy VII, with 11 million copies sold as of October 2015,[7] and became the second best selling game on the PlayStation.[83] The second best-selling title in the series is Final Fantasy X with over 8.05 million units sold as of August 2015 (not including the Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster).[84] Meanwhile, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn reached subscriber numbers of 5 million, making it the second most popular subscription-based MMO as of July 2015.[85] Mobile game Final Fantasy Record Keeper was downloaded over 5 million times in Japan alone as of August 2015.[86]

But even after getting chocobos, there's the extremely irritating issue of literal miles of invisible walls along roadways for no discernable reason I can see other than to make it difficult to get anywhere with any degree of ease. It wouldn't even be quite so irritating if it was a consistent rule, but it isn't! Some rails you can jump off of, some you can't, and there is no way to tell the difference until you try. It might make sense if it was a drop that would probably kill you if you lept off, but usually it's just some grass on the other side, infuriatingly out of reach over a very low jump unless you take the looooong way around. And, again, some of these rails go on for miles. How fun do you think it is to run your chocobo for miles and miles, searching for some obtuse way out? What a stupid decision.
He also appears in Nova's ending as part of the new Mega Nova Corps along with Proto Man, Beat, Roll and Zero as well as Thor's ending which was redone to include him along with Ryu and Morrigan. His other appearance in the game is that of a card in the "Heroes and Heralds" mode, as an "S Rank" card who's primary ability is halving the time used to charge attacks for characters with his secondary ability increasing the chance to gain rare cards of characters belonging to Capcom.
That makes the Double Gear system a fundamental change to the way Mega Man 11’s levels are designed. Giving us the power to slow time seems to have freed up the developers to add many more enemies, disappearing platforms, and trenches of spikes to navigate, lengthening levels significantly. These are the longest, most brutal levels yet in Mega Man, and I welcomed the challenge.
Like Link, several of Zelda's various incarnations are shown to be talented musicians. At least three of incarnations are known to be harp-players (Ocarina of Time, Skyward Sword, and Hyrule Warriors). She also shows a talent for playing wind-based instruments such as an ocarina and a pan flute. She is also been shown to have a talent for singing as well.
The series' popularity has led to it having an impact in popular culture, with appearances and references in anime, TV, and film. The music in particular has garnered much attention, such as winning a place on the Classic FM Hall of Fame,[15] and a performance from synchronized swimmers at the 2004 Summery Olympics to "Liberi Fatali" from Final Fantasy VIII.
The rescued princess journeys alongside Kirby until she is attacked and turned into a trophy by Bowser, who uses a swarm of Shadow Bugs to create a clone of the princess. If the princess is Zelda, the clone tries to attack Link and Yoshi, but is intercepted and destroyed by Mario and Kid Icarus hero Pit. Link notices the battle just in time to see what appears to be Zelda's trophy dissolve into nothing, and attacks Mario and Pit in a rage.
The game won multiple Wii-specific awards from IGN in its 2008 video game awards, including Best Racing Game[46] and Best Online Multiplayer Game.[47] IGN also nominated it for Best Family Game for the Wii.[48] The game was ranked ninth in Nintendo Power's "Best of the Decade."[49] It also won the award for "Favorite Video Game" at the 2010 Kids' Choice Awards.[50] Guinness World Records has awarded Mario Kart Wii with a record for being the best-selling racing video game of all time.[51]
Another common theme is rebellion. The protagonists are often forced to fight a higher power either on a quest for revenge, for freedom or another motivation. The higher power can range from an empire, such as the Gestahlian Empire from Final Fantasy VI, a religion, such as Yevon from Final Fantasy X, or a deity, such as the fal'Cie from Final Fantasy XIII. During the journey to vanquish these powers their threat escalates, until the protagonists free the world of the oppressor(s).
When Link goes back to the castle, she expends all of her power, even losing her physical form, in order to save a dying Midna. She regains her body later only to become possessed by Ganondorf, but his influence is purged from her body by Midna with the power of the Fused Shadows. Ganondorf makes another attempt on Zelda's life soon after, but she is protected by the Light Spirits of Hyrule, who grant her the magical Light Arrows so she can assist Link in part of his final battle. With the battle won and Midna revived, Zelda and Link bid her goodbye at the Mirror of Twilight.

When transitioning to the next generation of video game consoles, the now-merged Square Enix developed Final Fantasy XIII for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. It was developed using Crystal Tools, a proprietary engine built to develop games for the consoles. As the first high definition title, it allowed for a major improvement in graphics with many reviewers citing its visuals as a strong point.[25][26][27] The original release of Final Fantasy XIV was also developed using Crystal Tools, though its subsequent re-release, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, was developed using different technology.


^ Nintendo (November 18, 2011). The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword. Wii. Nintendo. Demise: I will rise again. Those like you... Those who share the blood of the goddess and the spirit of the hero... They are eternally bound to this curse. An incarnation of my hatred shall ever follow your kind, dooming them to wander a blood-soaked sea of darkness for all time!
Game Boy Advance Mario Kart: Super Circuit for Game Boy Advance, developed by Intelligent Systems, was released in 2001 as the first Mario Kart title for a handheld console. It retains the traditional elements of Mario Kart established by its predecessors; however, it is not without its new additions. Mario Kart: Super Circuit is the first entry in the series to feature unlockable retro tracks from a previous installment (in its case, the Super Mario Kart tracks). It is also the first installment where, in addition to the usual trophy, the player is also awarded with a ranking based on their performance. During a linked VS mode with only one cartridge, players can only choose from the four SNES Mushroom Cup courses, and must play as a Yoshi of a specific color. If all players have a cartridge, all racers and courses are available. This is the first Mario Kart game to have a feature that allows players to swap ghost data, in its case via the use of the GBA's Link Cable.

A series of video games was developed and released for the Philips CD-i in the early 1990s as a product of a compromise between Philips and Nintendo, after the companies failed to develop a CD-ROM peripheral for the Super NES. Created independently with no observation by or influence from Nintendo, the games are Link: The Faces of Evil and Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon, together with Zelda's Adventure. Nintendo never acknowledged them in the Zelda timeline, and they are considered to be in a separate, self-contained canon. These games are widely acknowledged to be the worst installments in the series.[102]
For example after nearly making it to through the hell of Bounce Man's level only to lose my last life and then being asked if I want to start from the beginning, I chose to return to the title screen in order to turn down the difficulty from Casual "for fans of the Megaman series who have not played in a while", to Newcomer "for those who have never played a Megaman game before" (Note that I find that very condescending as well as some of the trophies which are unlocked)
But even after getting chocobos, there's the extremely irritating issue of literal miles of invisible walls along roadways for no discernable reason I can see other than to make it difficult to get anywhere with any degree of ease. It wouldn't even be quite so irritating if it was a consistent rule, but it isn't! Some rails you can jump off of, some you can't, and there is no way to tell the difference until you try. It might make sense if it was a drop that would probably kill you if you lept off, but usually it's just some grass on the other side, infuriatingly out of reach over a very low jump unless you take the looooong way around. And, again, some of these rails go on for miles. How fun do you think it is to run your chocobo for miles and miles, searching for some obtuse way out? What a stupid decision.
Wii	Mario Kart Wii was released for the Wii in 2008. For the first time in the series, the player can race using motorcycles (labeled in-game as "bikes") and perform tricks while driving that produce speed boosts, such as mid-air stunts, slipstreaming, and wheelies. The game is primarily played using the plastic Wii Wheel accessory, which uses the controller's motion sensing to simulate operating a steering wheel. The game features 24 playable characters, the largest roster of the series at the time (Baby Daisy makes her debut in the Mario franchise, and other new additions to the Mario Kart series include Baby Peach, Funky Kong, Dry Bowser, and Rosalina; Mii characters saved in the console's Mii Channel are also playable). The concept of retro tracks is expanded to the Battle mode, with one retro battle course from each game in the series. When Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection was in existence, Mario Kart Wii allowed the VS and Battle modes to be played by up to twelve participants, and also featured the "Mario Kart Channel," which was available as an optionally selectable channel on the Wii Menu and allowed players to check their regional or global Time Trial rankings, send and receive ghost data, and participate in worldwide tournaments on modified courses with special objectives.

Stories have been worked on as a collaborative effort from multiple developers with concepts having drawn inspiration from multiple sources. In the early games, Sakaguchi drew inspiration from anime film maker Hayao Miyazaki, and staples such as chocobos and airships originally derived from them.[12] Furthermore, many have noted similarities between the series and Star Wars, present in references such as Biggs and Wedge and in recurring plot points such as an "Empire".[13] The series contains many darker themes of tragedy and loss, many inspired by the developers' own experiences. While developing Final Fantasy VII, the series creator Sakaguchi's mother died, which caused him to drastically reform the game's story to be about coping with loss.[14]
The official Twitter account for The Legend of Zelda recently unveiled new artwork featuring Zelda characters who are rostered in the new Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. The artwork showcases Breath of the Wild’s Link, sporting his blue Champions Tunic, alongside Toon Link and Child Link, each of whom are competing with Ganondorf, Sheik, and Princess Zelda in an attempt to reach the Triforce first. The artwork was released as part of a Nintendo-wide countdown to December 7th, when the game is released to the public and available to…

The good news is Mega Man 11 is pretty good. It's everything I expected from a Mega Man game. It does play it relatively safe, however. There is no risk to the formula or design, but this is necessary because the goal needs to be to get Mega Man back on track. That being said, just because it plays it safe doesn't mean it has nothing to offer. The level designs are extremely good (with Block Man's stage being a near perfect tutorial on how to make use of the game's new Double Gear system) and the levels are fairly lengthy and challenging to keep you going. It makes the game inviting, but Mega Man hasn't lost its trademark difficulty. The game is hard. If the clever level designs don't stump you every now and then, some of the bosses will.
The central conflict in many Final Fantasy games focuses on a group of characters battling an evil, and sometimes ancient, antagonist that dominates the game's world. Stories frequently involve a sovereign state in rebellion, with the protagonists taking part in the rebellion. The heroes are often destined to defeat the evil, and occasionally gather as a direct result of the antagonist's malicious actions.[3][74] Another staple of the series is the existence of two villains; the main villain is not always who it appears to be, as the primary antagonist may actually be subservient to another character or entity.[3] The main antagonist introduced at the beginning of the game is not always the final enemy, and the characters must continue their quest beyond what appears to be the final fight.[74]

In the Mario Kart series, players compete in go-kart races, distributed among several single-player and multiplayer modes, and control one of a selection of major Mario franchise characters. Up to twelve (originally eight) characters can compete in each race. When the characters are ready to begin racing in the starting grid, Lakitu comes in with a traffic light hanging from a fishing pole, which starts the countdown; when the light turns green, the race officially begins. During the race, the player's viewpoint is from behind or in front of his or her kart. The goal of the game is to either finish a race ahead of other racers, who are controlled by the computer and other players, or complete a circuit in the fastest time.


The central protagonist of The Legend of Zelda series, Link is the name of various young men who characteristically wear a green tunic and a pointed cap, and are the bearers of the Triforce of Courage. In most games, the player can give Link a different name before the start of the adventure, and he will be referred by that given name throughout by the non-player characters (NPCs). The various Links each have a special title, such as "Hero of Time", "Hero of the Winds" or "Hero chosen by the gods". Like many silent protagonists in video games, Link does not speak, only producing grunts, yells, or similar sounds. Despite the player not seeing the dialogue, it is referenced second-hand by in-game characters, showing that he is not, in fact, mute. Link is shown as a silent protagonist so that the audience is able to have their own thoughts as to how their Link would answer the characters instead of him having scripted responses.
In the Hyrule Warriors series, Princess Zelda acts as the Supreme Leader of the Hyrulean Forces and the Hyrulean Soldiers bravely serve her in much the same way as in Twilight Princess and Ocarina of Time. Despite her role as a military commander, she retains the compassion for the soldiers that serve under her but chooses to fight alongside them rather than protected by them. In turn her soldiers are very loyal to her and she can raise their moral with words alone, though this can be a double-edged sword as they become quite demoralized when she goes missing and were it not for the leadership of Link and Impa, the entire Hyrulean Forces may have been defeated by the Dark Forces. Though she later returned to fight alongside them under her guise as Sheik, they did not recognize her (though to be fair neither did Impa) and continued to search for the missing Princess. However they were relived when her identity was revealed and did not hold her deception against her. They also did not abandon her or Hyrule when Ganondorf managed to steal the Triforce of Courage and Triforce of Wisdom and later joined her in invading Gerudo Desert in order to defeat Ganondorf's generals, Zant and Ghirahim. After managing to defeat the villains, Zelda would lead her army to reclaim Hyrule Castle and defeat Ganondorf's Forces. The surviving soldiers would also fight alongside Zelda and her allies in the final battle against Ganon.

Jump up ↑ "Is that what I think it is?! Look at this! I don't believe it, but I actually caught one! This delicacy is known to have very, very potent effects under the proper circumstances. Ta-da! Research from the castle shows ingesting one of these can actually augment certain abilities. We wouldn't be in a controlled environment out here, and with your level of physical fitness...you'd be a perfect candidate for the study! Go on! Taste it!" — Zelda (Breath of the Wild)
In 1990, a junior novel version of Mega Man 2 was released as part of the Worlds of Power novel series. Mega Man is turned human by Dr. Light during an accident in a machine designed to clone Mega Man. Instead of a Mega Buster, human Mega Man uses a hand gun and instead of being able to copy the robot master's weapons, he instead takes them off of their arms. For some reason being human does not affect him much and he is still able to consume E-drinks (Energy Tanks) and gain a power boost. The book follows the general plot of Mega Man 2 and even provides game hints at the end of some chapters.
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Although Link uses the Triforce to wish for Demise's destruction, Ghirahim kidnaps Zelda upon her awakening and takes her through the Gate of Time, where Demise is still sealed.[54] Zelda's soul is absorbed and Demise is revived in his true form,[55] but Link manages to defeat the Demon King and seal his remains in the Master Sword. After her soul is restored, Zelda and the young hero return to their own time, where she mentions to Link that she wants to remain in the surface and watch over the Triforce. Zelda asks what Link's intentions are for the future,[56] and Link smiles at her, with the camera panning to show both his and Zelda's Loftwings flying back into the sky, implying that Link chose to stay with Zelda.
Various incarnations of Mega Man appear as playable fighters in the Marvel vs. Capcom series. The original was a playable fighter in Marvel vs. Capcom: Clash of Super Heroes and Marvel vs. Capcom 2: New Age of Heroes. He is assisted by his companion robots, Rush, Beat and Eddie. His sister robot, Roll, is also playable in both games, but is a secret character in the first game. Although he did not make a playable appearance in Marvel vs. Capcom 3: Fate of Two Worlds, and its successor, Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3, Zero from Mega Man X and Tron Bonne from Mega Man Legends appear as representatives for the series. Mega Man X appears as an alternate costume for Zero and Frank West and as a card in Heroes and Heralds mode. The original Mega Man appears in the arcade endings of Thor and Nova, and also appears on a poster in the Days of Future Past stage, and finally, as another card in Heroes and Heralds Mode. Mega Man X and Zero appears as playable characters in Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite, with Sigma appearing as both a DLC fighter and a major antagonist in the Story Mode, where he merges with the supervillain Ultron to become Ultron Sigma.[citation needed]
In order to prevent the ambitions of Dr. Wily, Dr. Light had modified him into the combat robot "Rockman". With Rockman's success, world peace arrived, and a Robot Alliance was organized. Thanks to robotics progress was rapidly made... But the betrayal of Mr. X! The one controlling Dr. Wily from the shadows, can the ambitions of Mr. X for world domination be stopped? The greatest battle of all time begins!!

9% (12.6% when fully charged, late hit) Mega Man puts his busters on the ground, creating two flame pillars on either side of him. Can KO opponents easily when fully charged if the clean hit is landed at medium damage percentages (65% or more) due to its very high knockback. After the attack, the Mega Busters open, venting out excess heat, meaning this move's cooldown is rather long.
At the 2006 Game Developers Conference, a trailer for Phantom Hourglass for the Nintendo DS was shown. It revealed traditional top-down Zelda gameplay optimised for the DS' features, with a cel-shaded 3d graphical style similar to The Wind Waker. At E3 2006, Nintendo confirmed the game's status as a direct sequel to The Wind Waker,[86] and released an extensive playable demo, including a multiplayer mode with "capture the flag" elements. Phantom Hourglass was released on June 23, 2007, in Japan, October 1, 2007, in North America and October 19, 2007, in Europe.

At one point, there was also a game in the series planned for the Virtual Boy in 1995. Tentatively entitled VB Mario Kart, it was likely to be the first sequel to Super Mario Kart. The game was canceled due to the Virtual Boy's failure, and was never reported in the media until revealed in the August 2000 issue of German gaming magazine The Big N, along with other shelved projects for that system.[9] Even though the GBA already had its own official Mario Kart game in Super Circuit, a tech demo called Mario Kart XXL was made for that system by Manfred Trenz of the company "Denaris Entertainment Software".

^ Nintendo, ed (1993). The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening instruction manual. Nintendo. pp. 3–4. "Though you fulfilled the Hyrulian prophecy of the Legendary Hero and destroyed the evil tyrant Ganon, the land of Hyrule enjoyed only a precarious peace. "Who knows what threats may arise from Ganon's ashes?" the restless people murmured as they knitted their brows and shook their heads. Ever vigilant, you decided to journey away from Hyrule on a quest for enlightenment, in search of wisdom that would make you better able to withstand the next threat to your homeland."
In The Wind Waker, when Link travels to Hyrule Castle beneath the Great Sea, there is a portrait of the Princess of Hyrule (around the age of Tetra) from before the Great Flood hanging on the wall of the castle. In the portrait, the princess is surrounded by several characters, all of which have a counterpart to a member of Tetra's Pirate Crew. It is known that during the Great Flood, she took a piece of the Triforce of Wisdom which had been broken in two by her father and fled to the mountaintops with several of her servants.[155]
Mario Kart 7 features stereoscopic 3D graphics, introduces hang gliding and submersible karts, and features an alternate first-person perspective and kart customization.[3] Introduces Metal Mario, Lakitu, Wiggler, and Honey Queen as new playable characters. It is also the first Mario Kart game after Mario Kart: Double Dash!! not to feature Waluigi as a playable character.
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