A series of video games was developed and released for the Philips CD-i in the early 1990s as a product of a compromise between Philips and Nintendo, after the companies failed to develop a CD-ROM peripheral for the Super NES. Created independently with no observation by or influence from Nintendo, the games are Link: The Faces of Evil and Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon, together with Zelda's Adventure. Nintendo never acknowledged them in the Zelda timeline, and they are considered to be in a separate, self-contained canon. These games are widely acknowledged to be the worst installments in the series.[102]


As the last free descendant, Zelda uses telepathy to contact the descendant of the Knights of Hyrule, Link, to save her.[32] Despite his efforts in evacuating her from Hyrule Castle, Agahnim manages to capture Zelda and sacrifice her to the Dark World, breaking the seal between Hyrule and the Dark World.[80][81] While in the Dark World, Princess Zelda is held inside a crystal prison within Turtle Rock.[82] When Link frees her, she, along with the other maidens, breaks the seal surrounding Ganon's lair.[83]
"I had a dream... In the dream, dark storm clouds were billowing over the land of Hyrule... But suddenly, a ray of light shot out of the forest, parted the clouds and lit up the ground... The light turned into a figure holding a green and shining stone, followed by a fairy... I know this is a prophecy that someone would come from the forest... Yes, I thought you might be the one... Oh, I'm sorry! I got carried away with my story and didn't even properly introduce myself! I am Zelda, Princess of Hyrule."
Although not the first game to be released outside of Japan, Final Fantasy VII was the first overseas to popularize the series, and the JRPG genre.[5][6] Although the game is still the best-selling game in the series, with over 11 million units sold between its original release and subsequent re-releases,[7] the series has continued to find financial success since and has become the company's best-selling franchise worldwide.[2]
In addition to the core game, Mario Kart 8 Deluxe includes all of the downloadable content released for the Wii U version. This means you can tackle the Animal Crossing track as Link on the Master Cycle, or unlock Mercedes-Benz kart components for Dry Bowser and race on the simple-but-awesome Excitebike course. With 48 race tracks, 8 battle arenas, 5 difficulty settings (including mirror and the furious 200cc), and 42 characters to choose from, Mario Kart 8 Deluxe is a behemoth package.
I've been a Legend of Zelda fan forever. From the Game Cube's Ocarina of Time to the Wii's Skyward Sword, I've played them all, and each time I have the same reaction: how do these games keep getting better!? Eventually, you would think that the Zelda world, puzzles, and story would get repetitive and old, but with each iteration, Nintendo manages to change just enough to recapture your interest and awe in familiar characters and places. The game offers all that we love and expect from of a Zelda game while adding an entire new layer of complexity and customization. The map is entirely open-world, which differs from traditional, linear Zelda games, and everything is destructible and collectible. To match this, the inventory system feels much more similar to a standard open-world game as well. This gives the familiar settings of Hyrule, Faron, and Gerudo--to name a few--an entirely different flavor! Breath of the Wild also makes perfect use of the Switch engine--it has superb, Nintendo-style graphics that are just realistic enough to completely immerse yourself while not being overly realistic as to detract from the cartoon-ish nature of the series. This style, combined with the seamless animations and dynamic movement of the Switch create a truly beautiful and stunning world to explore. This game is basically a friendlier, happier, and more puzzle-centric Skyrim. Speaking of the dynamic movements, this game captures all of the best aspects of the old Wii games while doing away with the clunky, unrefined aspects. Different weapons require different swing patters while looking around is as simple as pointing and clicking, but without the click! If this style of gaming isn't for you, the game is just as easy and intuitive on the traditional Switch controller. Overall, this is an amazing game that has something for everyone--phenomenal graphics and game play, memorizing story lines and characters, thought-provoking puzzles, and action and adventure for the whole family to enjoy. Even though I am writing this review as part of a contest, I would HIGHLY recommend this game to anyone and everyone, young and old, Zelda newbies and veterans--it will not disappoint!
The field areas often feature non-player characters and events that allow the player to play minigames, for mandatory or non-mandatory rewards. The first major minigames were introduced in the Gold Saucer in Final Fantasy VII where the player can play various games including chocobo racing and battle arena. Another notable minigame was the Dragon's Neck Colosseum in Final Fantasy VI where the player can bet items for rewards and fight various enemies. Card minigames are also popular, particularly Triple Triad introduced in Final Fantasy VIII, which has seen many iterations in following releases.

Super Mario Kart is by far one of my favorite Nintendo games. I had this game years ago and loved playing it. The graphics are great, the racing is fun, the courses are challenging and it's just an all around great game. I got rid of the Wii several years ago but just recently got another to play with my kids. They are in love with this game. They like to act like they are really driving with the wheel.


Each game typically features themes for different locations (or types of locations), story events, characters and battle themes (typically a basic battle theme, boss battle theme, and a final boss theme, as a minimum, with some special bosses having their own battle themes). There are many recurring themes, such as the "Chocobo Theme" associated with the series "mascot" creature, main series theme that has often played in the intro or in the ending credits, the "Victory Fanfare" that concludes won battles, "Prelude", also known as the "Crystal Theme" that has become one of the series' most recognizable themes, and "Battle at the Big Bridge", the boss battle theme of the recurring character Gilgamesh. Themes have often been rearranged for their appearances within different games to suit the various settings.

Jump up ↑ "Is that what I think it is?! Look at this! I don't believe it, but I actually caught one! This delicacy is known to have very, very potent effects under the proper circumstances. Ta-da! Research from the castle shows ingesting one of these can actually augment certain abilities. We wouldn't be in a controlled environment out here, and with your level of physical fitness...you'd be a perfect candidate for the study! Go on! Taste it!" — Zelda (Breath of the Wild)
The chronology of the Legend of Zelda series was a subject of much debate among fans until an official timeline was released within the Hyrule Historia collector's book, which was first released in Japan in December 2011.[31][32] Prior to its release, producers confirmed the existence of a confidential document, which connected all the games.[33][34] Certain materials and developer statements once partially established an official timeline of the released installments. Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is a direct sequel to the original The Legend of Zelda, and takes place several years later.[35][36] The third game, A Link to the Past, is a prequel to the first two games,[37][38][39] and is directly followed by Link's Awakening.[40][41] Ocarina of Time is a prequel that takes the story many centuries back; according to character designer Satoru Takizawa, it was meant to implicitly tell the story of the Imprisoning War from the manual of A Link to the Past, with Majora's Mask directly following its ending.[42][43] Skyward Sword is then a prequel to Ocarina of Time.[44] Twilight Princess is set more than 100 years after Ocarina of Time.[45][46]

Toward the end of Spirit Tracks, before the final battle against Malladus, Zelda is reunited with her body, and is no longer able to levitate. Link runs underneath her to catch her as she falls, and she lands on top of him and knocks them both to the ground. Upon awakening, Zelda, overjoyed to have her body back, embraces Link, causing him to blush. Finally, after Malladus is defeated, Zelda and Link watch Anjean and Byrne's spirits ascend to the heavens. The camera then lowers to show Zelda and Link holding hands while Zelda's Lullaby plays in the background. After the credits, a short cut-scene shows Zelda gazing at a picture of Link on the Spirit Train with her flying beside him, which she keeps on her desk. She may also wave at Link depending on his answer to a question Zelda asked him during the events of the story.
Es gibt immer eine Prinzessin, die es zu retten gilt, und Link ist stets auf der Suche nach dem legendären Master-Schwert. Auch das Triforce spielt eine Rolle: Hierbei handelt es sich um ein mächtiges Artefakt und in den falschen Händen um eine gefährliche Waffe. Und wo ein mächtiges Artefakt ist, können Ganondorf und ähnliche Bösewichte nicht weit sein. Logisch also, dass all diese Markenzeichen der Reihe auch im Zelda Merchandise auftauchen. Tauch in die Phantasiewelt ein und begebe dich auf die Spuren von Link.
Websites such as IGN, GameSpot, GamesRadar, and 1UP.com retrospectively held Mega Man X as a successful milestone in transitioning the Mega Man series from its increasingly stale existence on the NES to the SNES.[26][27][22][28] Brett Elston of GamesRadar stated, "X was a total reinvention of the series, a perfectly executed update that had fans anticipating its release with a fervor the franchise hadn't seen since the Mega Man 2 and 3 days."[27]
The Legend of Zelda takes place predominantly in a medieval Western Europe-inspired fantasy land called Hyrule, which has developed a deep history and wide geography over the series' many releases. Much of the backstory of the creation of Hyrule was revealed in the games A Link to the Past, Ocarina of Time, The Wind Waker, Twilight Princess, Skyward Sword, and A Link Between Worlds. Hyrule's principal inhabitants are pointy-eared humanoids called Hylians, which include the player character, Link, and the eponymous princess, Zelda.
Phantom Slash's fully charged attack is now momentarily delayed, allowing Zelda to move around before the Phantom rushes forward. Zelda can set it as a trap and attack the opponent in tandem with the Phantom, or she can retreat behind it for protection. This also discourages the opponent from reflecting the Phantom since she now has enough time to respond with Nayru's Love.

After Link finds a second Gate of Time and goes to the past, he meets up with Zelda there. It is then revealed that Zelda is the reincarnation of Hylia. She also confesses to manipulating Link's feelings for her (as Hylia) so that he could fulfill his destiny, a deed for which she is very remorseful. In order to maintain Demise's imprisonment, Zelda seals herself. While doing so, Zelda asks Link for him to wake her up when his mission is complete. 
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