Many course themes recur throughout the series, including circuit, dirt, off-road, beach, desert, snow, and haunted tracks. Most courses are based on an existing Mario location (such as Bowser's Castle), but there are a number of courses that have not appeared elsewhere, such as Rainbow Road. Each game in the series includes at least 16 original courses and up to 6 original battle arenas. Each game's tracks are divided into four "cups," or groups in which the player has to have the highest overall placing to win. Most courses can be done in three laps. Course outlines are marked out by impassable barriers and feature a variety of bends, ranging from sharp hairpins to wide curves which players can drift around. Numerous obstacles appear on the tracks, ranging from generic obstacles to those themed after the Mario games. For example, the Bowser's Castle tracks feature Thwomps and sometimes Fire Bars or Lava Bubbles; beach courses may feature crabs and/or Cheep Cheeps; and the Mario Circuit tracks, depending on the game, may incorporate anything from pipe barriers to franchise-staple enemies like Piranha Plants and Chain Chomps. Another common type of obstacle is off-road sections which slow down the karts, such as shallow water or mud bogs.
Mario Kart Wii features twenty-four playable characters from the Mario series, which was the largest roster of any Mario Kart game until the release of Mario Kart 8 in 2014.[5] The game features characters who have appeared in previous installments, including Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, Yoshi, Toad, Donkey Kong, and Bowser, in addition to characters such as Rosalina and Dry Bowser who are playable for the first time. Unlike Mario Kart DS, where characters can drive a kart exclusive to that character and the standard go-kart, each character is assigned to one of three different weight classes, which affects the selection of vehicles the character can drive. In addition to this, Mario Kart Wii introduced two different classes of vehicles, Karts and Bikes, with the latter being a new addition to the series. Bikes were also subdivided further into two categories: regular and sports bikes, with sports bikes featuring an alternate drift type known as inside drifting. Mii characters saved in the console's Mii Channel are also playable.[4] Thirty-six vehicles, which includes both karts and bikes, are available in Mario Kart Wii, each of which has different properties that affect how the vehicle handles while driving. Half the characters and vehicles are initially unavailable to the player; certain objectives must be completed in order to unlock each one.
Once rescued from Vaati, Link and Zelda flee down the Tower of Winds, similar to the escape from Ganon's Tower in Ocarina of Time. Zelda must be protected from damage during this escape. When nearing the exit however, the four Links and Zelda are sent tumbling deep beneath the tower by Ganon. While the four Link's are out cold, Zelda attempts to seal away Ganon with her magic, but is instead stopped and sealed away by Ganon himself. The four Links fight Ganon together, and eventually weaken him enough to break the seal on Zelda. Zelda then fights Ganon alongside the Links much like in The Wind Waker. While she does not wield the Light Arrows by name, she does wield a ball of light energy which, coupled with Link's arrows, serves the same function of the Light Arrows, stunning Ganon long enough for him to be drawn into the Four Sword. She must be protected from Ganon's attacks so the ball of light energy can become big enough to contain Ganon's evil might.
Multiplayer, both locally and online are quite good, better than I had expected. In fact, playing online is A LOT faster than XBox Live or PSN, take it from a core gamer. I was actually surprised to see how the Wii was able to connect me with players from around the world (Japan, Spain, Canada, etc) and all WITHOUT lag, I mean, none whatsoever. The entire online experience was smooth and may I add, quite addicting, I played for hours, I simply could not stop, it is that much fun.
Zelda was the young matriarch of Hyrule until its invasion by Zant, the Twilight King, to whom she surrendered in order to prevent the death of her people. Subsequently, she is imprisoned inside a tower in Hyrule Castle, although unlike her people, she does not become a spirit under the influence of the Twilight (possibly due to her implied possession of the Triforce of Wisdom). It is here that she meets Link, transformed into a wolf by the Twilight's power, though their conversation is cut short due to the arrival of her guard.
Following the release of The Wind Waker came The Legend of Zelda: Collector's Edition, which included the original The Legend of Zelda, Zelda II, Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and a demo of The Wind Waker. GameSpot noted that Majora's Mask suffered from a frame rate which appeared choppier and inconsistencies in the audio.[83] This compilation was never sold commercially, and originally could only be obtained by purchasing a GameCube bundled with the disc[84][85] (in North America, Europe and Australia), by registering a GameCube and two games at Nintendo.com,[84] or by subscribing or renewing a subscription to Nintendo Power (in North America) or Club Nintendo in Sweden.[84] In the UK, 1000 copies were made available through the Club Nintendo Stars Catalogue program.[85] After these were quickly claimed, Nintendo gave a copy to customers who mailed in proof of purchases from select GameCube games.[85]

The Legend of Zelda[a] is an action-adventure video-game series created by Japanese game designers Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka. It is primarily developed and published by Nintendo, although some portable installments and re-releases have been outsourced to Capcom, Vanpool, and Grezzo. The series' gameplay incorporates elements of action, adventure, and puzzle-solving games.
Mega Man's first animated appearance was as a main character in the 1989 series Captain N: The Game Master, which features a myriad of characters that had appeared on Nintendo consoles up until that time. They all aid the title character, Captain N, in his quest to save the world of Videoland, encountering many villains, including Mega Man's own enemy Dr. Wily. Mega Man is green and is voiced in this series by Doug Parker. His character also has a speech impediment and a tendency to add the word "mega" in front of words for emphasis.
Valiant Comics released a short series of comics featuring characters and settings from the Zelda cartoon as part of their Nintendo Comics System line. Manga adaptations of many entries in the series, including A Link to the Past, Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, Four Swords Adventures, The Minish Cap, and Phantom Hourglass, have been produced under license from Nintendo, mostly in Japan. These cartoons are usually not involved with the chronology of the actual games.[clarification needed]
In 1998, Nintendo cancelled The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time Ura. Originally intended as an expansion disk for Ocarina of Time on the Nintendo 64DD, poor sales figures for the N64DD system led Nintendo to cancel its plans for the release. In 2002, Nintendo released a bonus disc called The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time Master Quest. It contained emulated versions of Ocarina of Time and Ocarina of Time Master Quest with a number of modifications originally planned for release in Ocarina of Time Ura including GUI textures and text modified to reflect the GameCube.[citation needed]
Many course themes recur throughout the series. Most are based on an existing area in the Mario franchise (Bowser's Castle being among the most prominent), but there are a number of courses that have not appeared elsewhere, but still belong in the Mushroom Kingdom, such as Rainbow Road.[3] Each game in the series includes at least 16 original courses and up to 6 original battle arenas.[3] Each game's tracks are divided into four "cups", or groups in which the player has to have the highest overall placing to win. Most courses can be done in three laps. The first game to feature courses from previous games was Mario Kart: Super Circuit, which contained all of the tracks from the original Super NES game. Starting with Mario Kart DS, each entry in the series has featured 16 "nitro" (courses belonging to its own game) and 16 "retro" tracks (courses from previous Mario Kart games), spread across four cups each with four races. In Mario Kart 8, 16 additional tracks are available across two downloadable packages, eight for each package downloaded, including seven retro courses, four original courses, and five courses based on other Nintendo franchises, including Excitebike, F-Zero, The Legend of Zelda, and Animal Crossing.[5]
The controls are tight and easy to learn. I recommend buying extra wheel, but I would stick to the official, original Nintendo brand, I tried with cheaper versions, but none compared. Learning to control the karts with the wheel is easy and in no time you'll be dropping banana peels and throwing shells at your oponents. Even my wife, who is not a gamer by any means, was able to pick this up and enjoy it, she even beat me and the kids a couple of times.
Several incarnations of Zelda have ties to the Sheikah through both her connection to the various incarnations of Impa and Zelda's Sheikah alter-ego, Sheik. Interestingly enough, though not a true Sheikah (as Sheik is an alter-ego), Zelda's robes in Ocarina of Time and Twilight Princess feature the Sheikah Symbol. In the Oracle series, her robes feature an alternate version of the Sheikah Symbol with the "eye" part of the symbol replaced by a Triforce symbol. in Ocarina of Time, Zelda (in her guise as Sheik) is shown to be knowledgeable of various Sheikah legends, which were presumably told to her by Impa, either during her childhood and/or while they were hiding from Ganondorf. It is also implied that Impa trained Zelda in the secret arts of Sheikah in order to allow her to pass herself off as Sheik and better protect herself from Ganondorf and his minions.
The game introduces the double gear system. Using the shoulder buttons the player is able to activate either the power gear or the speed gear. The power gear makes your shots more powerful and the speed gear slows down enemies. You can only use each of these temporarily, because they'll over heat if you leave them active for too long. If this happens the double gear will will have to recharge before it can be used again. The game is perfectly designed so that you could make do without them, but it will push you to use these systems a lot. Some enemies are easier to dispatch with the speed gear, and most boss fights are made easier with the power gear. It seems gimmicky at first and upon first playing the game you'll often forget you have them, but once you settle in you'll find yourself using these systems more and more as you encounter hazards in levels that will encourage you to do so. There's another added benefit of the double gear system. When critically low on health you can press both shoulders at the same time to activate both the speed gear and power gear simultaneously. It's mostly a last ditch effort when low on health, and you can't actually turn this off, meaning your double gear will have to recharge without fail after its use, but it can help you out in a moment of desperation.
Wii U Mario Kart 8, released for the Wii U in 2014, introduces anti-gravity sections that allow players to drive on walls and ceilings, allowing for more alternate paths in courses. In these sections, a player can bump into other racers or special bumpers to trigger a Spin Boost, which gives them an extra speed boost. The game also introduces all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), allows the player to view replay data from others and upload highlights to YouTube via "Mario Kart TV", introduces the Koopalings as new playable characters, and allows up to four people to play in Grand Prix races. Baby Rosalina and Pink Gold Peach are also introduced as new characters to the Mario franchise. Additional characters, vehicles, and tracks have been released as downloadable content, including actual Mercedes-Benz vehicles. Characters that have been released as add-on content include Tanooki Mario, Cat Peach, the returning Dry Bowser, Link from The Legend of Zelda, and the Villager and Isabelle from Animal Crossing; tracks themed after various non-Mario game series have also been made available as add-on content. Additionally, Mario Kart 8 is notable for being the first game in the series to boast HD graphics and live-orchestrated music, as well as the first to receive post-release updates adding new features and enhancements, including rearranged post-race options, 200cc, and support for Nintendo's amiibo line of figurines.
I’m going to go ahead and post the Mega Man 11 Game Hints page even though it’s still a bit of a work in progress. (Looking back on it, I’ve gotten wordy in my old age...) Sorry about the delay! I’ll get the Data Base page up after I have a chance to collate all of the information. I still have some testing and playing to do; after all, there are still some pits out there that I haven’t fallen into yet.

-The N64 Rainbow Road retro track has been ruined. I was so pumped up for the return of this epic track, only now it's not so epic. Somehow they turned it from being the longest track in the series to easily the shortest track in this entire game. The track has great music, and comes off looking epic with all the flashy stuff and fireworks, but it's really over in like a minute. Sucks if you got off to a rough start because there's not much time to make up for that. The reasoning for this track being ruined is that you only do one lap around now, one full lap, split into 3 sections. Seeing as to how it was so long on the N64 version that you only did 2 laps, you're still only doing half the race. The track is still shorter because you're now going through it faster. I now want them to fix this track to be how it should have been, one of my favorite tracks has been made to be a huge disappointment.
This Zelda is stated to be the same Zelda from A Link to the Past as written in the Hyrule Historia. Impa tells Link she has been sent by Zelda to guard Din, the Oracle of Seasons, and Nayru, the Oracle of Ages, and to escort them back to Hyrule. Zelda herself only appears in the Linked Game by linking both counterparts. She is briefly captured, either by the Great Moblin or Vire depending on which counterpart is played, but Link rescues her. She then stays safely with Impa for a while. Towards the end of the story, she becomes upset at seeing the citizenry distraught over the evil powers pervading the land and speaks to them encouragingly to not give up hope. While she is out and about, Twinrova kidnaps her in a plan to revive Ganon, attempting to sacrifice her in order to light the Flame of Despair. Link saves her by defeating Twinrova, who sacrifice their own bodies instead of Zelda's. After Link defeats the mindless Ganon, Zelda kisses him on the cheek in gratitude. The seemingly surprised and genuinely flustered Link swoons while hearts float above the pair's heads, and Zelda looks away, blushing.
I beat Mega Man 11 on Normal in about eight hours. I’m no speed runner, but Mega Man 11 provides a lot of options for Mega Masochists looking for timed challenges, including remixes of levels with leaderboards, most of which unlock when you beat the campaign for the first time: Jump Saver challenges you not to jump, Buster Breakdown challenges you not to shoot, and Balloon Rush adds balloons that you have to destroy or avoid based on their color. I had spent enough time with Mega Man 8’s levels by this point so I didn’t have much drive to put up my times. The best bonus mode, though, is the mysterious Dr. Light’s Trial, which is an ultra-hard, one-life-only set of unique levels similar to Breath of the Wild’s Trial of the Sword DLC -- and even better, it unlocks another mystery trial mode (whose trial could that be?). Finally, you can pump up the difficulty to Superhero and play through the campaign again, if you dare.
Rather than just continuing to run, jump, and shoot, I sometimes found myself having to stop and figure out how to proceed forward, and other times being forced to move forward without having this chance and just dying over and over while I figure it out. I am actually thankful there are at least difficulty options because after an hour on the first level playing on Normal, I finally had to lower the difficulty to Casual. The reason for this is my next problem which is the LENGTH of levels. They just feel too long under the standard Mega Man rules. A single checkpoint in the middle is not enough when the levels are this long and complex. Thankfully Casual gives you more lives and checkpoints, but considering I beat the other games without this option, I felt a little sad to have to resort to this.
Among them are a slot car racer series based on Mario Kart DS, which comes with Mario and Donkey Kong figures, while Wario and Luigi are available separately. A line of radio-controlled karts have also been marketed, with are controlled by Game Boy Advance-shaped controllers, and feature Mario, Donkey Kong, and Yoshi. There are additional, larger karts that depict the same trio and are radio-controlled by a GameCube-shape controller.

When it came to Mega Man 9, the one most people considered the hardest, I didn't really think it was that bad, the difficultly never felt punishing and it was usually fair in how many power-ups you were given and how the levels got steadily harder as you went along. Then came 10 which I thought was just WAY too hard and not in a good way. Where 9 felt balanced, 10 felt cheap and I found myself dying over and over for the stupidest reasons before finally just giving up on the game.
Despite the many years since the last new release in the series, various characters from the Legends series consistently appear in Capcom cross-over games such as Marvel vs. Capcom, and the Servbot characters have become iconic within the Capcom community, making many cameo appearances in non-Mega Man games, including Dead Rising and as part of the outfit obtained via achievements in Lost Planet 2.
Beginning on the PlayStation in 1997, a 3D action game series called Mega Man Legends was created to take advantage of the console's advanced graphics hardware. The Legends series is set in the same world as the other Mega Man games, although thousands of years in the future. The world is covered by immense bodies of water and features the return of several major characters from the original series in different situations. The hero, Mega Man (Rock) Volnutt, is a relic hunter called a "Digger" who scavenges various ruins throughout the world in search of refractor shards that can be mined and traded as currency. Mega Man Legends brings the gameplay into 3D and is an action adventure with role-playing game elements.

I hereby pledge to you, kind internet strangers, to play OoT, TO COMPLETION, no matter how long it takes me. By "completion," I mean "defeat Ganon" (ain't got the staying power or skillz for 100%). I'm allowed to consult walkthroughs, but only when I'm on the verge of rage quitting, as this is more about willpower than it is intellect. I do have the original from when I was a child, but I've just bought the 3D version as it's portable, meaning I'll have less excuse to put it off (also it's an early Christmas treat to myself and only 16 quid on the Nintendo eShop). I'm hesistant to call this a New Year's resolution, as it might take me more than a year and I've started early, but hey ho. If I can do this, I can do anything!

The game is maybe 10-15% story missions, and the rest mostly filler sidequests. The story missions are fairly enjoyable, and the dungeons especially are probably the high points for the game in general (actual plot happening, interesting/funny chatter, unique enemies, often very beautiful scenery - the one in the Vesperwood is my favorite so far). It's a shame that there aren't more important sidequests. Previous entries in the FF series had more benefits from sidequests than just extra gil/consumables or a decent new weapon. There was more lore, more character-building.. but the majority of these sidequests just feel like busywork.
Though the MMO releases, Final Fantasy XI and Final Fantasy XIV, are members of the main series, with the exception of some abilities, some equipment, and the job system, they deviate from the traditional gameplay format due to their nature as games of a different genre. The MMOs are free-roaming with enemies appearing on the field, rarely use traditional menu systems (instead abilities are selected from a player-customized list) and use various features typical of MMO games. Being multiplayer games they include player interaction as well as trading between players. The player does not control a party, but multiple players can form one to fight in dungeons and against bosses.

Soon, the police came to arrest Dr. Light. Meanwhile, Mega Man went after the Robot Masters and, after he defeated a few of them, discovered that they were scheduled to be decommissioned and sent to the junkyard because they had reached the expiration date assigned to them by the government. Once the final robot had been taken down, Mega Man brought back his Memory Circuit Board to Auto for investigation. As it turned out, Dr. Wily had reprogrammed the robots, who were scheduled for demolition, to rise up against their human masters rather than be destroyed.
Mega Man's role in the original story is to battle the mad scientist Dr. Wily and his ever-growing army of robots, and stop them from taking over Earth by using their own special abilities against them. Utilizing his special Mega Buster arm cannon, and his ability to copy a defeated robot's Special Weapon, Mega Man must travel the world and traverse harsh environments in order to bring Wily's menace to an end. With the help of his creator Dr. Light and his assorted robotic companions, Mega Man's eventual goal is to one day achieve "everlasting peace".
Another feature to boost re-playability is the manual drift. All Mario Kart games had a power-slide around corners. In this one they give the choice of this drift being automatic or not. If you set it to automatic you don't get mini-boosts around corners. If you set it to manual you have to time when the slide starts but it is much more difficult than past games. It gives experienced players something extra to work on but doesn't seem unfair when somebody can drift manually well.
The tracks in Mario Kart Wii are based thematically on locations seen in the Mario series,[original research?] such as Bowser's Castle. Each of the eight cups features four different tracks for a total of 32 unique tracks, 16 of which are new to the series, while the other 16 are several tracks ported from previous installments.[6] The cups (groups of tracks) are the Mushroom, Flower, Star, Special, Shell, Banana, Leaf, and Lightning Cups. The Shell, Banana, Leaf, and Lightning Cups each contain retro tracks, updated versions of tracks originally found in the five previous Mario Kart installments. There are ten arena courses available for Battle mode, which include five original courses and five retro courses.[7]

Wily stumbled upon Proto Man one day, who was dying when his energy system was malfunctioning. He repaired him, and while analyzing him he discovered that he had found a way to create robots at the same level as Dr. Light. He decided to reprogram Dr. Light's industrial robots to exact revenge. One day, the industrial robots became misled and forced under his rule. With his new followers, Wily seized control of the city and demanded recognition. This string of events set in motion what would later become the purpose for Mega Man's existence.
Mario Kart 64 is the first 3D mario game, Nintendo tried before this to make a Mario Kart for SNES. Because it is 3D it gets a lot better and easier to control. With new "Time Trials" and characters it will be very exciting when you win the Grand Prix like 100 times and  keep doing it again for the entertainment. Because of the fact that there is not many bugs I think that it makes it even greater. If you are a Mario Kart fan or just a Mario fan then I think that you should get it. I rated it ........5/5
The addition will certainly benefit newcomers, because Mega Man 11 is difficult. I’ve spent hours mastering each stage, making slow but satisfying progress as I memorize enemy placement and boss attack patterns. Some levels and Robot Masters, however, are maddeningly hard on normal, particularly sections of the game with instant kills. More than a few times, a one-hit-kill mechanism, like a column of flame or a screen-sized Wily-built death machine, will chase Mega Man through a level. Making your way through a tricky section only to be steamrolled by one of these pursuing instant death dealers is never fun.

"Skyward Sword" was released in 2011 and really put the Wii controller to the test. Other spin-offswere released for Nintendo's numerous handheld systems which show Link in unusual adventuressuch as "Link's Awakening" for the Game Boy (1993) or "A Link Between Worlds" for the 3DS (2014).For those who not only want a virtual adventure but also want to take home a slice of the hero'sfantasy world, the Zelda fan merch in the EMP Online Shop will not disappoint.
There is one significant advantage to playing on Switch, however: You can totally cheat with amiibo! Scanning an amiibo while Mega Man 11 is paused instantly fills your health or weapon bars, or it might even give you a 1-Up, but it’s limited in that you can only scan a single amiibo once a day, and bonuses max out at 20 per day. (You can change your clock to get around this.) In a brutally hard game, this is a pretty fun (though potentially expensive) way to bend the rules.
The Crystal-theme can be said to be the overarching theme of the series, as a traditional Final Fantasy plot involves an antagonistic force trying to make use of the Crystals' power with the player power in opposition, sometimes chosen to wield the Crystal's power to enact their will as the Warriors of Light. Some games subvert this theme, such as Final Fantasy XII—where the Crystals are called nethicite—and the Fabula Nova Crystallis: Final Fantasy series with its various types of Crystal, showing that the power of the Crystals is not necessarily something that mankind should pursue despite its might.
In Hyrule Warriors and Hyrule Warriors Legends, Impa is Zelda's faithful servant/protector, general, and advisor. General Impa possesses a samurai-like devotion to Zelda, similar to her Ocarina of Time and Skyward Sword incarnations. When Zelda goes missing, Impa is determined to find Zelda and enlists the help of the inexperienced Hero Link to find her. Ironically, Impa is suspicious and distrustful of the mysterious Sheik, mostly due to Sheik claim that she is a Sheikah survivor and member of Impa's tribe. Impa fails to realize Sheik's true identity, until it is revealed following Fake Zelda's defeat. However she knows Zelda character well enough to realize the Princess Zelda causing trouble in the Era of the Hero of Time was nothing more than a fake. She is shown to be visibly relieved when she learns that Princess Zelda had been fighting alongside her and the Hyrulean Forces while disguised as Sheik, despite her deception. After reuniting with the Princess, Impa returns to her role as Zelda's advisor and defender. Though she respects Zelda's judgment, Impa is shown to voice her opinion about the potential consequences, such as when she warned Zelda of the dangers of having Link remove the Master Sword from its pedestal in the Temple of the Sacred Sword in order to defeat Cia. Impa's fears are later realized when the final seal on Ganondorf's soul breaks, though continues to serve Zelda even after Ganondorf obtains the complete Triforce.
Dash attack Top Spin 1% (hits 1-7), 3% (hit 8) Mega Man boosts forwards while spinning, damaging whatever he touches. Good priority and long lasting, equivalent to Luigi's dash attack. Useful for mindgames against shields due to its moderate shield stun, which often makes opponents drop their shield too early. Small noticeable ending lag. Based on Top Man's weapon from Mega Man 3.
×