Not much is known about Zelda's family; they are rarely mentioned or seen in-game. The king and the prince who were related to Zelda in The Adventure of Link are never even named—their actions merely provide an explanation for Zelda and the Triforce's conditions. It does seem though, that the King deeply trusted his daughter, as hinted in the prologue. It is also stated that Zelda's brother, despite his actions, did care for his sister and was devastated when he realized what his actions caused to her. The next time any known interaction between Zelda and a member of her family is mentioned is in Ocarina of Time; where the King of Hyrule (who is also Zelda's father) appears as an unseen character. The only thing that is even hinted about their relationship in that game though, is that the King did not seem to take all of his daughter's words seriously, which caused his downfall in the Adult Timeline and Fallen Hero Timeline.
Rockman can transform into Jet Rockman with the Rush Adaptor equipped. By holding down the jump button, air flight is possile with a jet injection, although for a short period of time. It can be checked by looking at the flight time gauge. The flight time is short when compared with the Rush Jet, but as it uses solar energy, it is possible to fly any number of times.
At the Temple of Hylia, when Zelda states she must seal herself to keep Demise in place, she sheds tears of sadness and states before all this, she was happy just being with Link on Skyloft, demonstrating a deep level of feelings for her childhood friend. Link desperately tries to stop her and when she is sealed, Link lowers his head in sadness, showing his deep feelings for her. Once Link releases Zelda from her sealed state, he runs up and catches her from falling. They both hug and walk out smiling at each other, holding hands, before Ghirahim ruins the tender moment. During the ending, Zelda asks what Link will do now. Link sweetly smiles at her while their Loftwings fly off toward the sky, implying that he chose to stay on the Surface to live with Zelda.
From Final Fantasy X onward the series has had other composers as Uematsu eventually left Square to go freelance, though he has continued to compose music for the series for as recent as the original Final Fantasy XIV. The soundtrack for Final Fantasy X was a joint effort between Uematsu, Masashi Hamauzu, and Junya Nakano, the music for Final Fantasy XII was mainly composed by Hitoshi Sakimoto, Masashi Hamauzu did the soundtrack for Final Fantasy XIII, and Yoko Shimomura—who had previously composed the music for Square Enix's Kingdom Hearts series—composed the music for Final Fantasy XV.
The PlayStation console saw the release of three main Final Fantasy games. Final Fantasy VII (1997) moved away from the two-dimensional (2D) graphics used in the first six games to three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics; the game features polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. It also introduced a more modern setting, a style that was carried over to the next game.[3] It was also the second in the series to be released in Europe, with the first being Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. Final Fantasy VIII was published in 1999, and was the first to consistently use realistically proportioned characters and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.[3][13] Final Fantasy IX, released in 2000, returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting rather than the more modern worlds of VII and VIII.[3][14]

Various incarnations of Mega Man appear as playable fighters in the Marvel vs. Capcom series. The original was a playable fighter in Marvel vs. Capcom: Clash of Super Heroes and Marvel vs. Capcom 2: New Age of Heroes. He is assisted by his companion robots, Rush, Beat and Eddie. His sister robot, Roll, is also playable in both games, but is a secret character in the first game. Although he did not make a playable appearance in Marvel vs. Capcom 3: Fate of Two Worlds, and its successor, Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3, Zero from Mega Man X and Tron Bonne from Mega Man Legends appear as representatives for the series. Mega Man X appears as an alternate costume for Zero and Frank West and as a card in Heroes and Heralds mode. The original Mega Man appears in the arcade endings of Thor and Nova, and also appears on a poster in the Days of Future Past stage, and finally, as another card in Heroes and Heralds Mode. Mega Man X and Zero appears as playable characters in Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite, with Sigma appearing as both a DLC fighter and a major antagonist in the Story Mode, where he merges with the supervillain Ultron to become Ultron Sigma.[citation needed]
There is one significant advantage to playing on Switch, however: You can totally cheat with amiibo! Scanning an amiibo while Mega Man 11 is paused instantly fills your health or weapon bars, or it might even give you a 1-Up, but it’s limited in that you can only scan a single amiibo once a day, and bonuses max out at 20 per day. (You can change your clock to get around this.) In a brutally hard game, this is a pretty fun (though potentially expensive) way to bend the rules.
Since Mario Kart 64, all player-characters have been grouped into one of three distinct weight classifications. Smaller characters, labeled as "lightweights," have high acceleration but low top speeds, and lose a minimal amount of speed when off-road but are easily knocked aside by heavier opponents. Medium-sized characters, or "middleweights," have an equal balance of weight, top speed, and acceleration, and lose a moderate amount of speed when off-road. The largest characters, labeled as "heavyweights," can easily knock aside most opposing racers, have high top speeds but poor acceleration, and lose great amounts of speed when off-road.

The Final Fantasy series usually puts the player in control of multiple characters in a party, though there are exceptions. The player will build the party's strength by gradually acquiring new abilities and equipment to handle more powerful opponents. In many games this task extends beyond the main story with challenging superbosses and bonus dungeons serving as optional tests of skill. As a Japanese role-playing game, many installments—particularly the earlier installments in the main series, or the throwback spin-offs returning to old formulas—involve frequent use of menus to select items, skills and upgrades.
Zelda then took the Master Sword to the Great Deku Tree in Korok Forest, considering it a safe place for the blade to rest for the next century though noted while Link would likely lose his memories as a result of the Slumber of Restoration she was certain the blade would reunite with its "master". Zelda tried to get the tree deity to relay a message he politely refused advising her it would sound better in her voice which Zelda took as a complement before placing the sword in its pedestal. After saying her goodbye to the tree, Zelda then left and returned to Hyrule Castle, where she used her powers to seal Calamity Ganon, and herself, away for the next one hundred years. This halted her aging while she was sealed.

In 1995, Square showed an interactive SGI technical demonstration of Final Fantasy VI for the then next generation of consoles. The demonstration used Silicon Graphics's prototype Nintendo 64 workstations to create 3D graphics.[114][115] Fans believed the demo was of a new Final Fantasy game for the Nintendo 64 console; however, 1997 saw the release of Final Fantasy VII for the Sony PlayStation.[115][116] The switch was due to a dispute with Nintendo over its use of faster but more expensive cartridges, as opposed to the slower and cheaper, but much higher capacity Compact Discs used on rival systems.[117][118] Final Fantasy VII introduced 3D graphics with fully pre-rendered backgrounds.[117][119] It was because of this switch to 3D that a CD-ROM format was chosen over a cartridge format.[117][120] The switch also led to increased production costs and a greater subdivision of the creative staff for Final Fantasy VII and subsequent 3D games in the series.[72]
Legacy Collection 1 and 2 also offer up timed Challenges, which are remixed Mega Man levels that provide a more substantial challenge. Players traverse through various parts of different levels, all while trying to beat a predetermined score. Mega Man levels are difficult, often rewarding a slow, methodical pace, but the Challenges are the complete opposite. Believe me, you’ll need all of your skills to complete them.
Prior the events of Majora's Mask, Zelda spends a relatively short period of time with Link, before he leaves Hyrule for his quest in search of his companion Navi.[105][106] Zelda, as a child, makes a single appearance in Majora's Mask when Link has a flashback after retrieving the Ocarina of Time from the Skull Kid. The events of the flashback display Link's last meeting with Zelda, where she states her belief that they would meet again.[107] However, before Link departs the land of Hyrule, Princess Zelda gives him the Ocarina of Time to prevent Ganondorf from entering the Sacred Realm and as a memento of the time they spent together.[108][109] She also teaches Link the "Song of Time", a melody that holds a special meaning to her,[110] before handing over the ocarina, mentioning that he should play that melody if something were to happen to him so the Goddess of Time will come to his aid.[111][112]
However Urbosa's Diary reveals that Urbosa has known Zelda for most of her life as the Queen of Hyrule brought the newborn Zelda to Gerudo Town as she and Gerudo Chieftain Urbosa were close friends in addition to being sworn allies. When the Queen died suddenly when Zelda was six, Urbosa attended the state funeral as both Gerudo Chieftain and a friend. However she worried about Zelda to the point a year after the funeral she went to Hyrule Castle to find out how Zelda was coping and even accompanied Zelda to the Spring of Power in place of Zelda's mother who was originally supposed to oversee Zelda's training but her death occured before Zelda began her training. Urbosa watched as Zelda fervently prayed to Hylia in the cold water until Urbosa was forced to pull her out causing Zelda to break down from all the pressure she was under along with her holding in her grief. Urbosa consoled Zelda as she let out all the emotions and grief she had been suppressing. Urbosa was one of the few people who understood the pressure Zelda was under and also was aware of the fact Zelda had been putting on a brave face after her mother's death while in truth grieved her mother's death as much if not more so than Urbosa and her father. Urbosa and Zelda became friends with Urbosa acting as a surrogate mother or aunt figure to Zelda. In addition to Urbosa's hatred of Ganon due to his origins as Ganondorf, Urbosa became a Champion to support Zelda despite her own people and advisers being against it. Urbosa however did her best to assist Link in finding Zelda when she abused Gerudo Town law to allude Link's protection detail and hoped the two would eventually get along showing while she cared for Zelda she did not share Zelda's biased opinion towards Link and likely recognized Zelda resented Link's talent given her struggles to awaken her power which Urbosa witnessed first hand. Like Link, Urbosa was fiercely protective of Zelda as she foiled an assassination attempt by the Yiga Clan and was prepared to kill them though relented when Zelda requested their lives be spared as the Yiga were simply misguided Sheikah angered over their peoples mistreatment in the past. However Urbosa had her soldiers gather intel on the Yiga Clan as they were still servents of Ganon. She was pleased Zelda and Link started getting along after Link had foiled another assassination attempt. As signs of Ganon's imminent return increased, Urbosa feared Zelda would run out of time to awaken her power and chose to pray to the late Queen of Hyrule's spirit instead of Hylia who failed to answer Zelda's prayers indicating Urbosa had more faith in Zelda's mother than Hylia. Additionally Urbosa took up the late Queen's habit of affectionately calling Zelda her little bird.
"The Legend of Zelda Theme" is a recurring piece of music that was created for the first game of the franchise. The composer and sound director of the series, Koji Kondo, initially planned to use Maurice Ravel's Boléro as the game's title theme, but was forced to change it when he learned, late in the game's development cycle, that the copyright for the orchestral piece had not yet expired. As a result, Kondo wrote a new arrangement of the overworld theme within one day.[7] The "Zelda Theme" has topped ScrewAttack's "Top Ten Videogame Themes Ever" list.[8]

Zelda and Peach are taken onto the Halberd, but are rescued when Metal Gear protagonist Solid Snake infiltrates the ship and defeats another pair of clones. Snake insists that the princesses stay were they are, but Peach and Zelda (who dons her Sheik disguise for the first time in the game, but can transform back to Zelda during the level) instead make their way to the upper deck of the ship, which has come under attack by Star Fox protagonist Fox McCloud. When Peach gets trapped in the crossfire, Sheik teleports into the air and directly attacks Fox's Arwing, forcing him to eject. Peach stops them before they can fight hand-to-hand. As they are joined by Snake and the Pokémon Lucario, a group of Mr. Game & Watches are forcibly ejected by Meta-Knight, who had infiltrated the Halberd with Lucario to take his ship back. The Game & Watches merge into the boss Duon, which is defeated by the heroes. Duon turns back into a single Mr. Game & Watch, who is befriended by Peach. The various heroes subsequently unite to launch an attack on the Subspace Realm from which the attacks have been originating.
However, the series has garnered some criticism. IGN has commented that the menu system used by the games is a major detractor for many and is a "significant reason why they haven't touched the series."[23] The site has also heavily criticized the use of random encounters in the series' battle systems.[167][168] IGN further stated the various attempts to bring the series into film and animation have either been unsuccessful, unremarkable, or did not live up to the standards of the games.[11] In 2007, Edge criticized the series for a number of related games that include the phrase "Final Fantasy" in their titles, which are considered inferior to previous games. It also commented that with the departure of Hironobu Sakaguchi, the series might be in danger of growing stale.[46]
Once Link returns to his own world, Zelda is overcome with joy at seeing him again, shedding tears. Soon after, Fi asks Link to put Master Sword back in its pedestal, which would mean their parting. While understanding Link's feelings and feeling sad herself, Zelda encourages Link to do, to which he complies with. Their parting is not a sad one however, with said goodbye ending on a happy note.
Many games offer different systems to allow more freedom when growing characters' abilities and stats beginning as early as Final Fantasy II. Often this features a mix of the ability points system, in which points are used to grow abilities without being determined by a job. One of the popular systems is the Materia system featured in Final Fantasy VII and other games in its sub-series, where the player equips characters with Materia that contain various command or support abilities, and accumulating ability points allows the Materia to grow and gain stat boosts and new abilities. Similarly, the magicite featured in Final Fantasy VI allows the player to equip magicite remains of espers with the accumulated ability points allowing the characters to learn the magic spells they contain, and once reaching a certain threshold the character learns the ability permanently to use it even without the equipped magicite. This way the player can directly control which party members use which skills and customize their party to their preferred play style.
On to the good, I really love the art style of this game which feels like a cartoon come to life, something which they were moving closer to on 8 and then backtracked from on 9 and 10. The design of everything is just spot on and I really love the creativity on display as well as the fact that this feels like it has an actual story (something the X games aimed for but the core series usually lacked). The controls are smooth and responsive as they should be in any good Mega Man game and this helps to offset the difficulty of some levels (as does the store which has a lot of helpful items to allow the game to be as hard or easy as you choose to make it).

As of April 2018, The Legend of Zelda franchise has sold over 80 million copies, with the original The Legend of Zelda being the fourth best-selling NES game of all time.[190][191] The series was ranked as the 64th top game (collectively) by Next Generation in 1996.[192] According to British film magazine Empire, with "the most vividly-realised world and the most varied game-play of any game on any console, Zelda is a solid bet for the best game series ever."[193]
When Link was appointed as Zelda's personal knight by King Rhoam after defeating a Guardian that went haywire during an experiment with a simple Pot Lid, her insecurities in regards to her inability to awaken her powers came to the surface, resulting in her lashing out at him out of jealousy due to his apparent success in fulfilling his destiny as he could already wield the Master Sword. Additionally she mistook Link's silence as a sign that he likely hated her. She grew tired of him following her around seeing him as a constant reminder of her own failure. However Link refused to follow her orders as the King assigned him to protect her which was his sworn duty as Captain of her Imperial Guard detail. Zelda even resorted to abusing Gerudo Town law to allude Link's protection detail though ended up falling asleep while calibrating Vah Naboris and Urbosa informed Link of her where abouts. Urbosa would also foil an assassinate attempt by disguised Yiga Clan members though Zelda convinced her to spare their lives. However, after Link saved Zelda's life when the Yiga Clan tried to assassinate her again near Kara Kara Bazaar, she realized that it was wrong of her to take her frustrations out on him, and befriended him thereafter. She was surprised to discover how gluttonous Link was and discovered his silence was due to his burden as chosen hero despite his skills he still had doubts but shouldered the burden of his destiny causing Zelda to see Link in an entirely new light. She came to respect and admire his dedication to his knightly training. The two bonded over the burdens they carried though Zelda became worried by Link's tendency to be reckless even noting there is a thin line between courage and recklessness.
Three main installments, as well as one online game, were published for the PlayStation 2 (PS2).[15][16][17] Final Fantasy X (2001) introduced full 3D areas and voice acting to the series, and was the first to spawn a direct video game sequel (Final Fantasy X-2, published in 2003).[18][19] The first massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) in the series, Final Fantasy XI, was released on the PS2 and PC in 2002, and later on the Xbox 360.[20][21] It introduced real-time battles instead of random encounters.[21] Final Fantasy XII, published in 2006, also includes real-time battles in large, interconnected playfields.[22][23] The game is also the first in the main series to utilize a world used in a previous game, namely the land of Ivalice, which had previously featured in Final Fantasy Tactics and Vagrant Story.[24]
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