The series has inspired numerous game developers. Fable creator Peter Molyneux considers Final Fantasy VII to be the RPG that "defined the genre" for him.[215] BioWare founder Greg Zeschuk cited Final Fantasy VII as "the first really emotionally engaging game" he played and said it had "a big impact" on BioWare's work.[216] The Witcher 3 senior environmental artist Jonas Mattsson cited Final Fantasy as "a huge influence" and said it was "the first RPG" he played through.[217] Mass Effect art director Derek Watts cited Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within as a major influence on the series,[218] and BioWare senior product manager David Silverman cited Final Fantasy XII's gambit system as an influence on the gameplay of Dragon Age: Origins.[219] Ubisoft Toronto creative director Maxime Beland cited the original Final Fantasy as a major influence on him.[220]
In Twilight Princess, following Zelda's surrender to Zant and due to the general ineffectiveness of the Hyrulean Soldiers, Telma formed a Resistance group dedicated to restoring the Kingdom of Hyrule to its glorious self. The Resistance included Zelda's former tutor, Auru, and Ashei, who is revealed to be the daughter of a former Knight who had served the Royal Family in the past. Loyal to both Zelda and the Kingdom, the Resistance members all aid Link (and by extension Midna) in freeing Hyrule. During Link's battles through Hyrule Castle, most of the members (minus Telma and Louise) arrive to assist the hero in fighting Ganondorf's minions, allowing him and Midna to reach the castle throne room.
As they continued to flee, they were cornered in West Necluda near Fort Hateno. Link wielding the Master Sword defeated countless Guardians until both he and the sword became battle worn and exhausted. With the remaining corrupted Guardians closing in, Zelda begged Link to run and save himself. However, he refused, instead staying to try and protect Zelda. When a Guardian began to target lock onto Link, Zelda positioned herself in front of him in an act of self-sacrifice, raising her right hand up to the Guardian. In that moment, her powers awakened, and all of the Guardians in the surrounding area were shut down by a blast of magical light which purged Ganon's influence from them. After this, however, Zelda heard a thump and turned around to find Link collapsed on the ground badly injured on the verge of death. Hopeless despite her success Zelda crying besides Link in total despair. Suddenly Master Sword glows as its dormant spirit then begans to speak to Zelda, telling her that Link could still be saved, reminding Zelda of the Shrine of Resurrection. Determined to save his life, Zelda insisted that Link be taken when they were found by two Sheikah warriors and later instructed Purah and Robbie to carry Link to the ancient medical as soon as possible. The Master Sword's spirit however convinced Zelda she still had a role to play.

Gameplay systems were originally based on those seen in RPGs released at the time the series was developed, though many systems which would become series staples were designed by Hiroyuki Ito. Ito developed systems, such as the Active Time Battle system inspired by Formula One racing (the concept of different character types being able to "overtake" each other). Ito refined the job system in Final Fantasy V to become the system used frequently throughout the series, and designed the Gambits system for Final Fantasy XII.[9] Other systems, such as the Materia system in Final Fantasy VII, were designed as a group effort, and was designed so the combat changed depending on how the Materia was used, as opposed to characters having innate skills.[10] Toshiro Tsuchida would design systems for other games, such as the removal of Active Time Battle in Final Fantasy X to replace with conditional turn-based battle, and later designed the Command Synergy Battle system for Final Fantasy XIII to make battles appear as visually impressive as in the movie Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children.[11] The MMO gameplay systems have been drastically different, but mostly drawn inspiration from a mix of the Final Fantasy games and from other games in the genre.


In Ocarina of Time, Link met up with a mysterious member of the Sheikah Tribe, fittingly called Sheik. This person taught Link a multitude of different songs and gave him tips on how to proceed in his quest. At the end of the game, Sheik revealed himself to be none other than Princess Zelda in a disguise.[3] During the seven years Link had been asleep while maturing to become ready to fight Ganondorf, Zelda had gone underground and taken the disguise as Sheik so that Ganondorf would not find her in his search for the two remaining pieces of the Triforce, one which was held by Princess Zelda herself.[72][73]
Historically speaking, Mega Man games that moved away from the squat, pixelated, grimacing Mega Man art style have had mixed results. While I never fully warmed up to Mega Man 11’s cutesy, highly-detailed graphical style, the new look didn’t interfere with the classic feel of Mega Man as it did in Mega Man 7, a beautiful, but slow and clunky game. There are some fantastic robot designs, like massive skull-faced pillars that shoot lasers from their mouths, a wooly mammoth on a hoverboard, and an ostrich that’s on fire. These recall the art of early Mega Man games while filling out contemporary 16:9 wide screens (a series first!), dwarfing Mega Man. It’s a great effect to make me feel nimble as I’m sliding around with time at a standstill to avoid giant, crazed bots.
In Twilight Princess, Zelda wields a rapier-like sword, though it is unknown if she authentically possesses any fencing skills as she is never shown actually attacking with it (Possessed Zelda does wield the sword, however since she was Ganondorf's puppet body, it was likely his fencing skills and not Zelda's). The Hyrule Warriors incarnation of Princess Zelda is shown to be a capable and graceful fencer who wields magical lightweight Rapiers that she can transform into a Bow of Light.
Happy Monday, everybody! I know I keep forgetting to post a Caption Contest every week, but I could not, under any circumstance, miss this week of all weeks. Super Smash Bros. Ultimate releases this Friday, and I’m sure the entire Nintendo fanbase is looking for a way to alleviate the anticipation. So why not let the Zelda Dungeon Caption Contest distract you for a little while as you wait for Ultimate to hit store shelves?
Zelda's body is eventually possessed by the resurrected Malladus, although Link frees it by firing a Light Arrow. Despite this, Zelda is unable to reenter her body, and just as Malladus is about to possess it again, Byrne uses his power to repel the Demon King, giving Zelda the strength to pray to her grandmother Tetra to reclaim her body.[128] In the final battle, Zelda, finally back in her own body, charges up her power to weaken the Demon King, which reveals a weak spot on the demon's back.[129] Like in previous games, Princess Zelda's role consists of shooting Light Arrows at Malladus's back from the Bow of Light.[130] Just as Link realizes that he cannot make the final blow to Malladus using the Lokomo Sword on his own, Princess Zelda rushes over to help the young hero, defeating the demon once and for all.[131] Anjean and the rest of the Lokomos depart to the heavens, entrusting Link and Zelda to watch over the land for them.[132] Link and Zelda are then seen holding hands as they witness the departure of the Lokomos.
Up until Breath of the Wild, the Legend of Zelda series avoided using voice acting in speaking roles, relying instead on written dialogue. Series producer Eiji Aonuma previously stated that as Link is entirely mute, having the other characters speak while Link remains silent "would be off-putting".[9] Instead of theme music for different locations, Breath of the Wild plays natural ambience around the player as main sounds, in addition to some minimalist piano music.[10]
Mega Man, known as Rockman in Japan, is a video game franchise created by Capcom, starring the robot character Mega Man, or one of his many counterparts. Mega Man, released for the Nintendo Entertainment System in 1987, was the first in a series of over 50 games on multiple systems. A roster of corrupted robot masters faced Mega Man in separate stages in the game. By March 2015, the series had sold about thirty million copies worldwide.[1]
Hit the road with the definitive version of Mario Kart 8 and play anytime, anywhere! Race your friends or battle them in a revised battle mode on new and returning battle courses. Play locally in up to 4-player multiplayer in 1080p while playing in TV Mode. Every track from the Wii U version, including DLC, makes a glorious return. Plus, the Inklings appear as all-new guest characters, along with returning favorites, such as King Boo, Dry Bones, and Bowser Jr.!
Mega Man appeared in an episode of the Screwattack webseries Death Battle, where he fought against his original inspiration Astro Boy in Mega Man vs Astro Boy. He ultimately lost due to the research team claiming that his opponent was considerably faster, stronger and more durable all-round. According to the research team, Mega Man's only real advantage (His superior arsenal and much stronger ranged weaponry) wasn't even significant enough to gain the upper hand- all of his weapons bar the Mega Buster were vulnerable to eventually running out of energy with repeated use, and were unable to harm Astro Boy for the most part anyway due to his extreme speed/agility and durability.
The next two games, Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, were released simultaneously for the Game Boy Color, and interact using passwords[73] or a Game Link Cable.[74] After one game has been completed, the player is given a password that allows the other game to be played as a sequel.[73] They were developed by Flagship in conjunction with Nintendo, with supervision from Miyamoto. After the team experimented with porting the original The Legend of Zelda to the Game Boy Color, they decided to make an original trilogy[75] to be called the "Triforce Series".[76] When the password system linking the three games proved too troublesome, the concept was reduced to two games at Miyamoto's suggestion.[77] These two games became Oracle of Ages, which is more puzzle-based, and Oracle of Seasons, which is more action-oriented.[78]
Biggs and Wedge, inspired by two Star Wars characters of the same name, appear in numerous games as minor characters, sometimes as comic relief.[23][73] The later games in the series feature several males with effeminate characteristics.[80][81] Recurring creatures include Chocobos and Moogles.[23] Chocobos are large, often flightless birds that appear in several installments as a means of long-distance travel for characters. Moogles, on the other hand, are white, stout creatures resembling teddy bears with wings and a single antenna. They serve different capacities in games including mail delivery, weaponsmiths, party members, and saving the game. Chocobo and Moogle appearances are often accompanied by specific musical themes that have been arranged differently for separate games.[3][23][73]
In 1994, near the end of the Famicom's lifespan, the original Famicom game was re-released in cartridge format.[60] A modified version, BS Zelda no Densetsu, was released for the Super Famicom's satellite-based expansion, Satellaview, on August 6, 1995, in Japan. A second Satellaview game, BS Zelda no Densetsu MAP2 was released for the Satellaview on December 30, 1995. Both games featured rearranged dungeons, an altered overworld, and new voice-acted plot-lines.[61]
+The beautiful art style makes up for anything lacking in the graphics department. The Wii U and Switch are not on par with the PS4 and Xbox One, so don't expect that type of beauty, but the art style truly does make a big difference. Nintendo has always been king when it comes to gorgeous art and design. Exploration is one of the game's biggest draws. Conquering the 100+ shrines is amazing!
When transitioning to the 32bit era, Square began to develop games in 3D. A tech demo in 1995 using Final Fantasy VI characters, Final Fantasy VI: The Interactive CG Game, showed the kind of technology they were using. Square opted to develop on the PlayStation, as opposed to the Nintendo 64 as originally intended, due to its use of disc storage instead of the more limited cartridges,[20] and the game still required three discs of storage. Final Fantasy VII was the most expensive game at the time to develop, costing $145 million,[21] though $100 million was spent on marketing.[22] It used pre-rendered backgrounds and character models instead of 2D sprites, in addition to introducing full-motion video sequences. Character models used on the field and those in battle differed, with blocky and less detailed models used on the field. When developing Final Fantasy VIII, Square Enix opted to use a more photo-realistic style, and there was no longer a distinction between field and battle models. The game used more FMVs, and required four discs of storage. Final Fantasy IX was similar, and though its art style was not one of a photorealistic game, it did allow for greater detail than seen previously in the series.

The Crystal-theme can be said to be the overarching theme of the series, as a traditional Final Fantasy plot involves an antagonistic force trying to make use of the Crystals' power with the player power in opposition, sometimes chosen to wield the Crystal's power to enact their will as the Warriors of Light. Some games subvert this theme, such as Final Fantasy XII—where the Crystals are called nethicite—and the Fabula Nova Crystallis: Final Fantasy series with its various types of Crystal, showing that the power of the Crystals is not necessarily something that mankind should pursue despite its might.
Start your engines & get set to play anytime with Mario Kart 8 Deluxe from Nintendo Switch. With more characters & lot, more battling & racing fun to have. Players can now choose from up to over 40 characters characters. Choose between Dry Bones, King Boo & Bowser Jr. along with the Inklings as all-new guest characters. With 48 different battle courses to race on, this definitive version of Mario Kart 8 is sure to incite & immerse players in that colorful & magical world of Mario Kart like never before. With its surreal gameplay & even marking the glorious return of DLC. It is everything a Nintendo fan could ask for & more. Available on the Wii U & Nintendo Switch. Go ahead & challenge your friends with the revised battle mode from the Wii U version. With the handheld mode, players can now challenge friends & racers around the world anytime, anywhere.
Some time later, Dr. Wily claims to have changed and teams up with Dr. Light to create a giant peacekeeping robot called Gamma. However, the new Robot Masters created to mine the Energy Elements needed for Gamma's construction have gone out of control. Mega Man goes after them, meeting his brother, Proto Man (under the alias Break Man in this game, until the ending) along the way. Mega Man soon retrieves the crystals, but returns to discover that Dr. Wily has stolen Gamma and plans on using it to take over the world.
Grand Prix – Players compete in various "cups," groups of four courses each (five in Super Mario Kart) with difficulty levels based on the size of the engine, larger engines meaning faster speeds. Before Mario Kart 8 there were four difficulties: 50cc, 100cc, 150cc, and 150cc Mirror (courses that are mirrored in terms of direction). Mario Kart 8 added a fifth difficulty level: 200cc. Players earn points according to their finishing position in each race and the top three players with the most points overall will receive a trophy.
Zelda is featured on four stickers. Two of these are titled "Young Zelda," while the other two are simply titled "Zelda." The first two depict artwork of Zelda as a child from Ocarina of Time and The Minish Cap, and provide a +20 bonus to electric attacks and a +16 bonus to battering resistance, respectively. The latter can only be used by Link, Toon Link, Zelda, and Ganondorf. The two stickers titled "Zelda" depict artwork of Zelda from A Link to the Past and of her adult form from Ocarina of Time. The former grants a +27 bonus to magic attacks and, like all other stickers that grant bonuses to magic attacks, can only be used by Zelda and Peach. The latter grants a +18 bonus to flame resistance and can only be used by Link, Toon Link, Zelda, and Ganondorf.

Various incarnations of Mega Man appear as playable fighters in the Marvel vs. Capcom series. The original was a playable fighter in Marvel vs. Capcom: Clash of Super Heroes and Marvel vs. Capcom 2: New Age of Heroes. He is assisted by his companion robots, Rush, Beat and Eddie. His sister robot, Roll, is also playable in both games, but is a secret character in the first game. Although he did not make a playable appearance in Marvel vs. Capcom 3: Fate of Two Worlds, and its successor, Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3, Zero from Mega Man X and Tron Bonne from Mega Man Legends appear as representatives for the series. Mega Man X appears as an alternate costume for Zero and Frank West and as a card in Heroes and Heralds mode. The original Mega Man appears in the arcade endings of Thor and Nova, and also appears on a poster in the Days of Future Past stage, and finally, as another card in Heroes and Heralds Mode. Mega Man X and Zero appears as playable characters in Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite, with Sigma appearing as both a DLC fighter and a major antagonist in the Story Mode, where he merges with the supervillain Ultron to become Ultron Sigma.[citation needed]
As in his home series, Mega Man's moveset relies heavily on various projectiles, giving his attacks unusual functions and characteristics. This extends beyond his special moves and into his standard moveset. For his neutral attack, he fires shots from his Mega Buster, and for his forward tilt, he fires shots from his Mega Buster while walking. His up tilt, the Mega Upper, is a jumping uppercut, and his down tilt is a forward slide.

The success of Final Fantasy and its key role within Square Enix's business plan has served as a double-edged sword. The first movie in the franchise, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within, was a box office flop with a net loss of $72-102 million,[87] and delayed the merger between Square and Enix.[88] On the other hand, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn was primarily responsible for overturning the company's financial losses at the end of 2013.[89]
This game was a gift for my brother's birthday and he and I remember playing Megaman from our childhoods so this game was a much anticipated gift! Game is crisp and clean with new style of graphics. Megaman uses a whole new time slowing ability and/or power up ability allowing Megaman to unload MEGA devastation on his enemies! You will see new boss power-ups like never before with Megaman's copy techniques and good ole dog rush and friends return for support.

Zelda was featured in three games made by a third party for the Phillips CD-i system. In Link: The Faces of Evil (1993), she was kidnapped by Ganon and had to be rescued. In Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon (1993) and Zelda's Adventure (1994), Princess Zelda was the main protagonist, as the plot in both games involves Link's kidnapping. The games are generally criticized by fans, although they are noteworthy as the first time Zelda has been a playable character in any game.


Three Zelda-themed LCD games were created between 1989 and 1992. The Zelda version of Nintendo's Game & Watch series was released first in August 1989 as a dual-screen handheld electronic game similar in appearance to today's Nintendo DS. It was re-released in 1998 as a Toymax, Inc. Mini Classic and was later included as an unlockable extra in Game & Watch Gallery 4, a 2002 compilation for the Game Boy Advance. While the Game & Watch Zelda was developed in-house by Nintendo, the subsequent two LCD games were developed by third parties under license by Nintendo. In October 1989, The Legend of Zelda was developed by Nelsonic as part of its Game Watch line. This game was an actual digital watch with primitive gameplay based on the original Legend of Zelda. In 1992, Epoch Co. developed Zelda no Densetsu: Kamigami no Triforce for its Barcode Battler II console. The game employed card-scanning technology similar to the later-released Nintendo e-Reader.
Interested in the Divine Beasts, Guardians, and Ancient Sheikah technology, she began dedicating herself to science instead of prayer, feeling it would be a better use of her abilities though continued to train and pray though her studies served as another way to contribute to Hyrule's defense in her own way. Zelda and a team of Sheikah researchers lead by Impa's elder sister Purah worked together to understand ancient technology discovering the Sheikah Slate, Shrine of Resurrection, and a better understanding of Guardians and the Divine Beasts which Zelda recorded in her research notes. She even shared her knowledge with the Zora Royal Family concerning Vah Ruta's water pumps. She also researched other things besides ancient technology such as plants and animals that enhance physical abilities when consumed showing she enjoyed scholarly research as she found it fascinating and wasn't burdened by it unlike prayer as she had prayed fervently to Hylia numerous times with nothing to show for it despite her dedication. Zelda personally recruited the four Champions to pilot the Divine Beasts convincing all of them to join her in defending Hyrule.
The Final Fantasy series has also featured a more basic, traditional turn-based system, such as the original Final Fantasy through to Final Fantasy III that do not rely on time, but the player and the enemy party take turns executing commands. Final Fantasy X features a Conditional Turn-Based Battle system where turns are taken based on an Act List, the turn order depending on the units' stats and statuses, and commands being ranked usually with stronger commands having longer "recovery time" until the unit can act again.

Custom 2 Danger Wrap 3% (loop), 7% (last) Fires an explosive wrapped in a bubble that floats upwards in an exponential arc and will explode if it comes into contact with an enemy, or on its own after a few seconds. Whilst harder to use than both the Crash Bomber and Ice Slasher due to its unusual trajectory, it deals more damage and knockback. It is based on Burst Man's weapon from Mega Man 7.


Capcom, regarding Mega Man as a versatile character, has placed him in several different gaming situations outside of his usual series. He has since been seen as a sports star in the Super Nintendo game Mega Man's Soccer, a race car driver in Mega Man: Battle & Chase, a board game card in Wily & Right's RockBoard: That's Paradise, and several mobile phone games, including, but not limited to, Mega Man Pinball, Rockman Tennis, Rockman The Puzzle Battle, Chokkan! Rockman, Rockman Poker, and Rockman no Dot Art Logic. A limited release arcade fighting game series containing Mega Man: The Power Battle and Mega Man 2: The Power Fighters pitted Mega Man against several boss characters from his original series. Mega Man also appears in the social RPG Rockman ×over as Battle Memory and a Legend Armor of OVER-1 referred to as OVER-R.

Forget everything you know about The Legend of Zelda games. Step into a world of discovery, exploration, and adventure in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, a boundary-breaking new game in the acclaimed series. Travel across vast fields, through forests, and to mountain peaks as you discover what has become of the kingdom of Hyrule In this stunning Open-Air Adventure. Now on Nintendo Switch, your journey is freer and more open than ever. Take your system anywhere, and adventure as Link any way you like.


The series centers on Link, the playable character and chief protagonist. Link is often given the task of rescuing Princess Zelda and the kingdom of Hyrule from Ganon, who is the principal antagonist of the series; however, other settings and antagonists have appeared in several games. The plots commonly involve a relic known as the Triforce, a set of three omnipotent golden triangles. The protagonist in each game is usually not the same incarnation of Link, but a few exceptions exist.
Zelda's B button attacks lend themselves to this defensive style of play as well. Din's Fire is a long range setup attack allowing the player to control a guided fire "mine," which explodes upon release. Nayru's Love is a crystal shield which not only reflects projectiles, but damages nearby enemies and pushes them away. Farore's Wind is Zelda's third jump, a teleport move which can be directed and has enormous range, but leaves her somewhat vulnerable. If Zelda invokes the teleport while physically touching an enemy character, that character will take damage, but this is very hard to pull off in practice. Fans may remember her three magic attacks as the same ones Link acquired in Ocarina of Time, albeit with quite different applications. Instead of a fourth attack, her final command is the transformation to Sheik.
Mega Man X received criticism from some publications as well. Ed Semrad, Danyon Carpenter, and Al Manuel of the EGM review panel all noted that the game may have too low a difficulty level; Semrad disliked the introductory stage and felt that the game was too short as well.[23] Super Play editor Zy Nicholson lowered his review score of the game because he found the levels were neither large nor challenging. "A few elementary tricks like repeating easy sections to recoup energy and weapon power will see you through the harder bits," Nicholson explained. "Within the level you'll also find restart points, extra lives, and no harsh time limit to put pressure on your performance. Couple this with a password system that records your level completion, status and weapon accumulation and you'll see we're not looking at a lasting challenge for the experienced player."[25] Nintendo Power criticized how little the game had changed stating that "the theme remains the same as the Game Boy and NES Mega Man titles."[20] The game's title initially proved a source of some confusion; the gaming media reported that many gamers mistook the "X" for the roman numeral 10.[29]
She often wears jewelry such as ornate earrings (which in some games feature a Triforce design), as well as a royal gown of white, pink, lavender, or another pale color (red in The Adventure of Link), usually bearing the Royal Family's crest. Zelda has also been depicted in casual attire, such as in Skyward Sword, or in a blue shirt with Hylian embroideries as the Champions commander in Breath of the Wild.
Mega Man's personality seems to stem from his creator, Dr. Light, whose intention may have been to design Rock based on his own interpretation of a real boy as if it were his very own son. Rock, who would later be upgraded into the super fighting robot known as Mega Man, demonstrates a wide range of emotions, similar to that of a prepubescent boy, not typical of other robots, thus making him unique.
Mega Man, known as Rockman (ロックマン Rokkuman, from the phrase "Rock 'n Roll") in Japan, also known as Mega or Rock in his original form, is the title protagonist of the "Classic" Mega Man series developed by Capcom since 1987. The pixel art for Mega Man was created by the designer of the original game in the series, Akira Kitamura (credited under the pseudonym "A.K"), and later turned into a refined illustration by Keiji Inafune (credited under his famous pseudonym "Inafking").[2][3] Since then, he has become one of the company's primary original characters and continues to be one of the video game industry's most recognizable icons. Having appeared on many gaming systems since the Nintendo Entertainment System, Mega Man has had a wide gaming audience, and his games continue to evolve with the ever-changing hardware demands of modern gaming systems. Mega Man's fictional universe can be divided into seven categories, each featuring different variations and incarnations of the same blue hero. Although "Mega Man", or "Rockman", is usually the name used to describe only the original Mega Man from the classic series, it can also be used less specifically to describe the Mega Man series of fictional works, or the group of adherently named main characters within.
The field areas often feature non-player characters and events that allow the player to play minigames, for mandatory or non-mandatory rewards. The first major minigames were introduced in the Gold Saucer in Final Fantasy VII where the player can play various games including chocobo racing and battle arena. Another notable minigame was the Dragon's Neck Colosseum in Final Fantasy VI where the player can bet items for rewards and fight various enemies. Card minigames are also popular, particularly Triple Triad introduced in Final Fantasy VIII, which has seen many iterations in following releases.

This Zelda is stated to be the same Zelda from A Link to the Past as written in the Hyrule Historia. Impa tells Link she has been sent by Zelda to guard Din, the Oracle of Seasons, and Nayru, the Oracle of Ages, and to escort them back to Hyrule. Zelda herself only appears in the Linked Game by linking both counterparts. She is briefly captured, either by the Great Moblin or Vire depending on which counterpart is played, but Link rescues her. She then stays safely with Impa for a while. Towards the end of the story, she becomes upset at seeing the citizenry distraught over the evil powers pervading the land and speaks to them encouragingly to not give up hope. While she is out and about, Twinrova kidnaps her in a plan to revive Ganon, attempting to sacrifice her in order to light the Flame of Despair. Link saves her by defeating Twinrova, who sacrifice their own bodies instead of Zelda's. After Link defeats the mindless Ganon, Zelda kisses him on the cheek in gratitude. The seemingly surprised and genuinely flustered Link swoons while hearts float above the pair's heads, and Zelda looks away, blushing.
So, would I recommend this game? Sure. Is it a must-have? Nah. If you're on the fence, wait until it goes on sale and play something better in the meantime. It's obviously been rushed out in the past couple years, and it's not much of a Final Fantasy game in terms of pacing and plot and cohesiveness in general, but it is a generally entertaining action RPG, if fairly repetitive.
Arcade Machine Mario Kart Arcade GP was the first Mario Kart title for arcades, released in 2005. Designed for Nintendo's Triforce arcade board and developed by Namco, the game features 11 playable characters and 24 tracks. As in other arcade racing games, players are required to drive to the goal under a limited amount of time. The machine also features many more items than the Nintendo titles, and houses a camera that will take a photograph of the player's face to display above the player-character during multiplayer races. This is the first Mario Kart game where characters originating from outside the Mario franchise and its sub-series are playable, as three characters from the Pac-Man games, namely Pac-Man, Ms. Pac-Man, and the ghost Blinky, are playable.
No level is the same, and their motifs match the Robot Master who rules that domain. You can choose the order in which you tackle stages, and each Robot Master gives Mega Man a new power upon being defeated, opening up new strategies for subsequent levels. There’s lots of fun to be had with trial and error, figuring out which boss to face first and which powers will defeat the next Robot Master faster. Sometimes it’s as easy as Bubble Man’s power (water) defeating Heat Man (fire) but some get more obscure, especially in the later Mega Man games.

Three weeks after Wily found Ra Moon, the electromagnetic field begins to affect all the machinery and electronics around the world. Roll falls into a coma victim of the electromagnetic field, and Wily makes a worldwide broadcast saying to the world surrender for him in two weeks, or else he will shut down all machinery, which would effectively kill Roll and all the robots around the world, and without them, humans would die as well. Dr. Light quickly immunizes Mega Man and his brothers (the Robot Masters from Mega Man 1 : Cut Man, Elec Man, Ice Man, Fire Man, Bomb Man, and Guts Man) from the electromagnetic field, and sends them to stop Dr. Wily before it's too late. During the adventure, Mega Man and his comrades fought their way to the source of Electromagnetic field, Ra Moon, battling the Robot Masters from Mega Man 2 and 3 in the process. In the end, Mega Man manages to destroy Ra Moon and the eletromagnetic field ceases, Roll recovers and all the machinery around the world starts functioning again.

Following the release of The Wind Waker came The Legend of Zelda: Collector's Edition, which included the original The Legend of Zelda, Zelda II, Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and a demo of The Wind Waker. GameSpot noted that Majora's Mask suffered from a frame rate which appeared choppier and inconsistencies in the audio.[83] This compilation was never sold commercially, and originally could only be obtained by purchasing a GameCube bundled with the disc[84][85] (in North America, Europe and Australia), by registering a GameCube and two games at Nintendo.com,[84] or by subscribing or renewing a subscription to Nintendo Power (in North America) or Club Nintendo in Sweden.[84] In the UK, 1000 copies were made available through the Club Nintendo Stars Catalogue program.[85] After these were quickly claimed, Nintendo gave a copy to customers who mailed in proof of purchases from select GameCube games.[85]


Square had been developing simple RPGs, pseudo-3D games and racing games, although they failed to compete with the market, and did not perform well commercially. Series creator Hironobu Sakaguchi and his team grew pessimistic at the failures as the company faced bankruptcy, so he began to develop the RPG Final Fantasy as a personal final project to leave a legacy; if the game had sold poorly, he would have quit the industry to return to university.[3]
Soon, the police came to arrest Dr. Light. Meanwhile, Mega Man went after the Robot Masters and, after he defeated a few of them, discovered that they were scheduled to be decommissioned and sent to the junkyard because they had reached the expiration date assigned to them by the government. Once the final robot had been taken down, Mega Man brought back his Memory Circuit Board to Auto for investigation. As it turned out, Dr. Wily had reprogrammed the robots, who were scheduled for demolition, to rise up against their human masters rather than be destroyed.
The series' popularity has led to it having an impact in popular culture, with appearances and references in anime, TV, and film. The music in particular has garnered much attention, such as winning a place on the Classic FM Hall of Fame,[15] and a performance from synchronized swimmers at the 2004 Summery Olympics to "Liberi Fatali" from Final Fantasy VIII.
In 2002, a follow-up series to the Mega Man X franchise was developed for the Game Boy Advance which starred Zero, a character created for the Mega Man X series as a sidekick/ally of Mega Man. The series revolved around Zero battling a powerful human-supremacy force as he protects the oppressed remaining reploids. In the Mega Man Zero series, the gameplay is largely similar to Zero's play style in the later Mega Man X games and features an in-depth ranking system that rewards the player with new abilities and enhancements (such as copied abilities from boss characters) in exchange for better play performance. In the fourth game, Zero can also physically steal weapons from enemies (such as axes and guns).
To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the series in 2011, Nintendo commissioned an original symphony, The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses. The show was originally performed in the fall of 2011 in Los Angeles and consists of live performances of much of the music from the series.[215] It has since been scheduled for 18 shows so far throughout the United States and Canada.[215][216] Nintendo released a CD, The Legend of Zelda 25th Anniversary Special Orchestra CD. Featuring eight tracks from live performances of the symphony, the CD is included alongside the special edition of The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword for the Wii. Nintendo would later celebrate The Legend of Zelda's 30th anniversary with an album which was released in Japan in February 2017.[217]
The Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) also featured three installments of the main series, all of which have been re-released on several platforms. Final Fantasy IV was released in 1991; in North America, it was released as Final Fantasy II.[7][8] It introduced the "Active Time Battle" system.[9] Final Fantasy V, released in 1992 in Japan, was the first game in the series to spawn a sequel: a short anime series, Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals.[3][10][11] Final Fantasy VI was released in Japan in 1994, titled Final Fantasy III in North America.[12]

At the story's start, she takes Link, whom she has been childhood friends with since they were infants, to the Picori Festival in Hyrule Town. During the ceremony following the Picori Festival Tournament, she is turned into stone by the winner, Vaati. Vaati is an evil mage searching for a legendary Light Force, and knowing Zelda has mystical powers of her own, he wants to keep her out of the way. Later, discovering that her power is, in fact, the Light Force, Vaati invades Hyrule Castle and abducts the petrified Princess, planning to sacrifice her and become a god. Link, after reforging the Four Sword, attacks the castle and faces off against Vaati. Upon defeating the evil mage, Link uses the power of the Four Sword to restore Zelda, who tells Link she had seen him on his adventure as if through a dream, to normal. Zelda then uses the power of the Magic Cap and Light Force to return Hyrule to its natural state. The overflowing power of life causes the Minish Cap to break apart. Ezlo then states that Zelda's kindness as well as the power of the Minish Cap (or Light Force, in the Japanese version of the game) created a miracle. With the time to part nearing, Zelda and Link see Ezlo off as he returns to the Minish World.

Mega Man's first television appearances were produced for the American market and were based on the classic series. First was Captain N: The Game Master (1989-91), a show that took place in a universe that was made up up many different Nintendo games. It featured Mega Man as a main character and also featured Dr. Wiley as one of the antagonists. This was followed by Mega Man (1994-95), the first series to be based in the Mega Man universe.[citation needed]
Another feature to boost re-playability is the manual drift. All Mario Kart games had a power-slide around corners. In this one they give the choice of this drift being automatic or not. If you set it to automatic you don't get mini-boosts around corners. If you set it to manual you have to time when the slide starts but it is much more difficult than past games. It gives experienced players something extra to work on but doesn't seem unfair when somebody can drift manually well.
As the series progressed, various other player characters have appeared, such as fellow Maverick Hunter Zero who was created by Dr. Wily of the Classic series, OVER-1, created jointly by Dr. Light and Dr. Cossack, and Axl, a Reploid with an adolescent personality who has the ability to shape-shift into other Reploids. Zero would later star in his own spin-off series, Mega Man Zero.

Nintendo's 2011 timeline announcement subsequently posits that following Ocarina of Time, the timeline splits into three alternate routes: in one, Link fails to defeat Ganon, leading into the Imprisoning War and A Link to the Past, Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, Link's Awakening, The Legend of Zelda and The Adventure of Link. In the second and third, Link is successful, leading to a timeline split between his childhood (when Zelda sends him back in time so he can use the wisdom he has gained to warn the Zelda in the past of the horrifying fate of Hyrule) and adulthood (where the Zelda from the future lives on to try and rebuild the kingdom). His childhood continues with Majora's Mask, followed by Twilight Princess and Four Swords Adventures. The timeline from his adult life continues into Wind Waker, Phantom Hourglass and Spirit Tracks.
Magic is another common RPG element in the series. The method by which characters gain magic varies between installments, but is generally divided into classes organized by color: "White magic", which focuses on spells that assist teammates; "Black magic", which focuses on harming enemies; "Red magic", which is a combination of white and black magic, "Blue magic", which mimics enemy attacks; and "Green magic" which focuses on applying status effects to either allies or enemies.[3][73][82] Other types of magic frequently appear such as "Time magic", focusing on the themes of time, space, and gravity; and "Summoning magic", which evokes legendary creatures to aid in battle and is a feature that has persisted since Final Fantasy III. Summoned creatures are often referred to by names like "Espers" or "Eidolons" and have been inspired by mythologies from Arabic, Hindu, Norse, and Greek cultures.[73][74]
The Adult Timeline is the timeline that follows the events after Link is being sent back to his original time, following the Hero of Time's defeat of Ganondorf in the final battle. Ganondorf is sealed within the Sacred Realm by the Seven Sages but, with Link sent back in time, the world is left without a Hero. This turn of events created the timeline containing The Wind Waker, Phantom Hourglass, and Spirit Tracks.
Down aerial Hard Knuckle 14% (clean), 12% (late) Mega Man points his fist straight downwards and fires it downwards as a short-ranged projectile. The fist deals the most damage in the first few frames, but afterwards, it turns into an aerial-only meteor smash. It is based on Hard Man's weapon from Mega Man 3. Mega Man can move himself left or right slightly during the first few frames before launching the fist. Has a weak floating effect before firing.
Final Fantasy is a video game franchise developed and published by Square Enix. It is a Japanese role-playing game series with varying gameplay, settings and stories between each installment, retaining plot and gameplay elements throughout, focusing on fantasy and science fantasy settings. Though the core series is a role-playing game franchise, it has branched into other genres, such as MMORPGs, tactical role-playing games, action role-playing games, and fighting games. The series has been distributed on many platforms, beginning with the Nintendo Entertainment System, and including consoles, computers, mobile operating systems and game streaming services. The series has also branched into other forms of media, particularly films, novels, and manga.
After defeating Calamity Ganon in Hyrule Castle, at Windvane Meadow, Zelda aids Link in his battle with Calamity Ganon's second form, Dark Beast Ganon, gifting him with the Light Bow and giving him advice on how to defeat him. After Link hits Ganon's weak spot, Zelda herself appears, freed from her own sealing magic. She then uses her powers to seal away Ganon for good, entrapping him in an explosion of light. As she and Link reunite face-to-face for the first time in a hundred years, she asks him with a smile if he remembers her.
In the year 20XX, ancient ruins suddenly appeared in the Amazon Rainforest in South America. The United Nations called scientists around the world to discover everything possible about the ruins. The scientists discovered that there was a strong eletromagnetic field around the ruins that was capable of ceasing almost all the machinery that got close to it, including robots. Nothing electronic could reach it, making the investigation a difficult one. One year later, the U.N. ceased the investigation, claiming the ruins were from the Maya civilization. They named the ruins "Lanfront Ruins" and the pyramid "Temple of Moon".
Mario Kart Wii features twenty-four playable characters from the Mario series, which was the largest roster of any Mario Kart game until the release of Mario Kart 8 in 2014.[5] The game features characters who have appeared in previous installments, including Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, Yoshi, Toad, Donkey Kong, and Bowser, in addition to characters such as Rosalina and Dry Bowser who are playable for the first time. Unlike Mario Kart DS, where characters can drive a kart exclusive to that character and the standard go-kart, each character is assigned to one of three different weight classes, which affects the selection of vehicles the character can drive. In addition to this, Mario Kart Wii introduced two different classes of vehicles, Karts and Bikes, with the latter being a new addition to the series. Bikes were also subdivided further into two categories: regular and sports bikes, with sports bikes featuring an alternate drift type known as inside drifting. Mii characters saved in the console's Mii Channel are also playable.[4] Thirty-six vehicles, which includes both karts and bikes, are available in Mario Kart Wii, each of which has different properties that affect how the vehicle handles while driving. Half the characters and vehicles are initially unavailable to the player; certain objectives must be completed in order to unlock each one.
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