I’m going to go ahead and post the Mega Man 11 Game Hints page even though it’s still a bit of a work in progress. (Looking back on it, I’ve gotten wordy in my old age...) Sorry about the delay! I’ll get the Data Base page up after I have a chance to collate all of the information. I still have some testing and playing to do; after all, there are still some pits out there that I haven’t fallen into yet.

Arcade Machine Mario Kart Arcade GP VR is a Mario Kart arcade game for virtual reality arcades, released by Bandai Namco in Japan.[4] Instead of using Item Boxes, the game uses balloons to store items, and the player must make hand motions (differing depending on the item used) to use said item. Four arcade cabinets are present in a given location, where players can play as Mario, Luigi, Peach, and Yoshi respectively. A CPU-controlled Bowser and Wario also appear in races.
Mega Man is the protagonist from the comic book series. He also appeared in Sonic the Hedgehog, Sonic Universe and Sonic Boom during the crossovers Worlds Collide and Worlds Unite. Aside from those appearances, Mega Man had a cameo appearance as a statue in the cover of Sonic the Hedgehog #89 (only his torso can be seen, behind the title) and a spray painting in the introduction page of Sonic Super Special #10. He was also vaguely referenced a few times in Sonic the Hedgehog #252.
Tetra is skilled with a catapult (or so she assures Link), and it is reasonable to assume she knows how to use the bombs she has her pirate crew steal at one point. As a member of the Royal Family, she can use the Pirate's Charm to communicate with its holder and keep an eye on his doings within a certain range. Curiously, she is much more tan as Tetra than when she assumes her Princess Zelda form. At the end of The Wind Waker, she resumes her identity as Tetra and sets sail with Link in search of the land that will become the New Hyrule. This leads into the events of Phantom Hourglass and Spirit Tracks.
Zelda is kidnapped by Ganon, who imprisons her in his lair on Death Mountain. Before she was kidnapped, she shattered the Triforce of Wisdom into eight shards and scattered them throughout Hyrule to hide them from Ganon and prevent him from gaining its power. She then sent her nursemaid Impa in search of a hero that could reassemble the Triforce of Wisdom, be powerful enough to defeat Ganon, and rescue her. Zelda is not actually seen in this game until after Ganon is defeated.
The relationship Zelda has with Link is close, possibly her closest. A popular theory among fans is that of a romantic relationship between some of the Zelda and Link characters in the Zelda series. Although never explicitly confirmed in a video game title, this theory is based on hints given in the games, interviews with the game creators, and content of the animated series, comics, and manga (although the last three are generally considered non-canonical).

In Twilight Princess, following Zelda's surrender to Zant and due to the general ineffectiveness of the Hyrulean Soldiers, Telma formed a Resistance group dedicated to restoring the Kingdom of Hyrule to its glorious self. The Resistance included Zelda's former tutor, Auru, and Ashei, who is revealed to be the daughter of a former Knight who had served the Royal Family in the past. Loyal to both Zelda and the Kingdom, the Resistance members all aid Link (and by extension Midna) in freeing Hyrule. During Link's battles through Hyrule Castle, most of the members (minus Telma and Louise) arrive to assist the hero in fighting Ganondorf's minions, allowing him and Midna to reach the castle throne room.
Despite these advantages, Mega Man is not without flaws. His grounded mobility is comparatively poor, with his dashing speed in particular being the 13th slowest in the game. This leaves Mega Man at a disadvantage against characters with better mobility, such as Sheik and Fox. Mega Man's melee attacks also have short range overall despite their extensive utility, causing him to struggle up close against characters with disjointed range like Marth, Link, and Shulk, while the high ending lag on his attacks puts more stress on this flaw. Mega Man's above average weight and falling speed also makes him an easy target for combos and juggles. Finally, Mega Man's projectile-heavy playstyle is also his biggest weakness, as he is heavily affected by powershielding, reflectors, absorbers, and other anti-projectile tools, which can shut down both his approach and defense options.
Some other manga series that have not been localized outside Japan include a 12-volume Rockman X adaptation by Yoshihiro Iwamoto, over 15 Classic and X adaptations by Shigeto Ikehara, a light-hearted adaptation of Rockman Zero by Hideto Kajima, a slapstick adaptation of Shooting Star Rockman by Masaya Itagaki, another Battle Network adaptation by Jun Keijima and Miho Asada called Rockman EXE Battle Story, and a short series of slapstick Battle Network and Star Force-themed adaptations by Takumi Kawano.

In The Minish Cap, Princess Zelda is known to sneak out of the castle to visit her good childhood friend, Link.[57] At the beginning of the game, Link and Zelda head together towards the Picori Festival in Hyrule Castle Town.[58] A catastrophe occurs when the evil wind mage, Vaati, appears and turns Zelda to stone, breaking the Picori Blade in the process. Link fuses the four elements to transform the blade into the Four Sword to reverse Vaati's spell. When Link saves Princess Zelda atop the roof of Hyrule Castle where she was being imprisoned by Vaati to steal the Light Force within her, she reveals to Link that she saw visions of him, as if in a dream.[59] However, soon after this, the castle begins to collapse.[60] As Link and Zelda head towards the Elemental Sanctuary, Vaati appears again and is subsequently defeated by Link. The Mage's Cap falls down and Ezlo, now a Minish again, urges Princess Zelda to make a wish. Princess Zelda thus wishes for Hyrule to return to its usual, peaceful state, making all the monsters disappear and returning its people back to normal.[61]
Featured articles Articles in need of citations Mega Man characters Robot Masters Characters with music names Playable Characters Light Numbers Protagonists Special Weapons Users Mega Man's Soccer Players Mega Man: Battle & Chase Racers Rockman Strategy Characters voiced by Doug Parker Characters voiced by Ian James Corlett Characters voiced by Gregory Smith Characters voiced by Christopher Gray Characters voiced by Ruth Shiraishi Characters voiced by Cole Howard Characters voiced by Benjamin Diskin [Configure Reference Popups]
Even after his crushing defeat at the hands of Mega Man, Dr. Wily was already planning his next scheme. If he could get his hands on the time machine (named Time Skimmer in the American manual) that was being developed at the Time-Space Research Laboratory (named Chronos Institute in the American manual), he thought he just might be able to change the past.
This game adds bikes, which I think adds nice diversity and feels very well balanced. The karts tend to be faster with better mini boosts from jumps and corners. The bikes can pop wheelies to get a mini boost on the straight stretches but are more vulnerable to being thrown off balance. My wife likes playing with karts and I like bikes, and I think she usually wins.

-There's no minimap on the screen during races or battle mode. You apparently have to use the gamepad screen for the minimap, which is pointless if you're not playing using the gamepad or unfair in local multiplayer if only one person gets to use the gamepad. Also by removing your eyes from the road to look down at the gamepack can often result in disaster. So, what the heck, I want an onscreen minimap as is tradition.

I bought this for my kids because of the great memory I had playing Zelda 2 when I was a kid. That was one of the most challenging and rewarding games I had ever finished. I've not played video games for over 25 years until getting the switch and BOTW. I am amazed at how much gaming has improved and how much I've missed out! I like that this game is not all about fighting and is not too violent and gruesome. The game is fun for all ages and even my youngest 5 year old boy enjoys playing it, although he mostly just explores the villages and experiment with cooking. The biggest problem with this game is that it is so addictive that we'll play it all day and don't want to do anything else. So my wife is not too happy.

Princess Zelda appears in this game solely as Tetra, her alter ego in The Wind Waker. She does not regain her royal persona, although quite often when she appears, “Zelda's Lullaby” plays in the background, and she is called "Zelda" by some of the pirates during the game's intro,[123] much to Tetra's chagrin.[124] Her role is somewhat limited in the game as she is kidnapped early on in the story, and when Link finds her at last she has been turned to stone.[125]
In some games, lines of coins are found on the courses, which if run over and collected, will increase a kart's top speed and can be used to unlock kart parts. Having coins also helps players when their kart is hit by another: instead of spinning and losing control, they lose a coin. Coins are also lost when karts are struck by power-ups or fall off the tracks. The series also features advanced maneuvers such as drifting (also called power sliding), which allows a kart to rapidly turn in a direction preventing the need to brake; and hopping, which helps a kart to avoid obstacles or off-road parts and sometimes can be used to execute tighter turns (the kart makes a short hop and turns in the air, speeding off in the new direction when it lands).
Non-playable cameo appearances by Mega Man occur most often in other Capcom licensed games, and he is often seen as a background character. Such appearances include Mega Man Legends 2 (as a TV character), The Misadventures of Tron Bonne (TV character), Mega Man Star Force 2 (Brother), Adventure Quiz: Capcom World 2 (enemy), Street Fighter Alpha 3 (in a billboard), Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter (in a banner and one of Norimano's attacks), Super Gem Fighter: Mini Mix (Felicia's attacks), Mighty Final Fight (in a billboard from the ending scene), and Power Stone 2.
Outside of his armor, Rock appears as a ten-year-old boy with spiky hair, the color of which varies between games from black to brown. His armor, however, resembles that of most other Robot Masters in that it's a skintight bodysuit with large rounded coverings on the lower arms and legs, and typical 'superhero briefs'. Mega Man's primary color is light blue with a dark blue 'trim' (his arms, legs, helmet and 'briefs'). His helmet has a raised light blue square in the forehead and a light blue ridge running straight back from the square, resembling an exclamation mark. His helmet also features round light blue sections with red circles in the center over his ears. He also has red circles in his Mega Buster and below his feet.
Other games in the series deviate further from the typical formula. Final Fantasy XII has player characters learn License Points (a variation of the ability points system) to spend on a License Board to purchase "licenses" to wield different equipment, use different spells and boost stats, with total freedom. In the International Zodiac Job System re-release the License Boards are based on jobs. In Final Fantasy X characters learn abilities based on a Sphere Grid that begins linearly but the player can eventually branch the grid out further, and potentially max all stats with various items usable to alter and improve Sphere Grid growth. Another example featuring items for growing skills is Final Fantasy VIII where magic spells are collected into an inventory similar to items, and acquired through refine or draw abilities, with other abilities learned via ability points from the character's equipped Guardian Forces.
Down tilt Sliding 8% (clean), 5% (late) Mega Man's signature sliding kick attack; he slides approximately four character lengths forward with a kick. Very little startup with low knockback; the hitbox lasts all the way until the slide is finished, which can hit opponents attempting to roll away. A good surprise move, but only if not overused. The actual sliding ability introduced in Mega Man 3 is a non-damaging maneuver, though said ability becomes weaponized with the Charge Kick, Charge Man's weapon in Mega Man 5.
In Ocarina of Time, Link met up with a mysterious member of the Sheikah Tribe, fittingly called Sheik. This person taught Link a multitude of different songs and gave him tips on how to proceed in his quest. At the end of the game, Sheik revealed himself to be none other than Princess Zelda in a disguise.[3] During the seven years Link had been asleep while maturing to become ready to fight Ganondorf, Zelda had gone underground and taken the disguise as Sheik so that Ganondorf would not find her in his search for the two remaining pieces of the Triforce, one which was held by Princess Zelda herself.[72][73]

Up tilt Mega/Rock Upper 17% (clean), 12% (mid), 8% (late) A quick rising uppercut. Based on the move of the same name from Mega Man 2: The Power Fighters, Marvel vs. Capcom and Street Fighter X Tekken, which is itself a tribute to the Shoryuken from the Street Fighter series. For a tilt, it has incredible power (in fact being stronger than his uncharged up smash), with the sweetspot having as much power as some smash attacks and being able to reliably KO medium-light characters under 90%. It has little starting lag but very high ending lag and little horizontal range. It also pushes Mega Man forward a slight distance; if Mega Man uses the move near a ledge, he will fall off and grab the ledge.
As Mega Man defeats each of the Robot Masters, he finds capsules of the strange energy Dr. Wily took from the island. When he returns to the lab, he gives the samples to Dr. Light for study, but the robot he found earlier breaks free and heads out to the desert. Mega Man goes after him and briefly fights him, but realizes that his opponent is holding back. Before he can consider it further, the robot flees and Proto Man appears, telling him that Wily's new headquarters is up ahead.
Three main installments, as well as one online game, were published for the PlayStation 2 (PS2).[15][16][17] Final Fantasy X (2001) introduced full 3D areas and voice acting to the series, and was the first to spawn a direct video game sequel (Final Fantasy X-2, published in 2003).[18][19] The first massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) in the series, Final Fantasy XI, was released on the PS2 and PC in 2002, and later on the Xbox 360.[20][21] It introduced real-time battles instead of random encounters.[21] Final Fantasy XII, published in 2006, also includes real-time battles in large, interconnected playfields.[22][23] The game is also the first in the main series to utilize a world used in a previous game, namely the land of Ivalice, which had previously featured in Final Fantasy Tactics and Vagrant Story.[24]
×